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Rootgrow

Last post 31-07-2018 7:08 AM by Backache. 9 replies.

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  • 21/07/2018 09:05 PM
    • poppikin
    • Glorious Surrey
    • 06 Apr 2009
    • 579
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    I have some Rootgrow about 5 years old. I went to buy a replacement at the garden centre and they said it's still good to use and good for some years yet. Does anyone know if it is? poppikin

  • 22/07/2018 07:44 AM
    • Backache
    • W. Kent
    • 31 Dec 2012
    • 266
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    I am a great fan of this product. I believe it would still retain its beneficial qualities even when five years old. There is no "best before " date on the packet. I would certainly use it!

  • 23/07/2018 03:49 AM
    • poppikin
    • Glorious Surrey
    • 06 Apr 2009
    • 579
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    Thanks Backache. I used to love it but this packet is from when I stopped using it after I used it on a special Acer Griseum that died. Wisley had recommended it and they replaced the Acer and there was a long correspondence with the firm about it. The suggestion now is to use it on some young Beech hedge plants. Thanks for help. poppikin

  • 23/07/2018 07:05 AM
    • Backache
    • W. Kent
    • 31 Dec 2012
    • 266
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    Thats very interesting poppikin. Did Wisley Advisory suggest that the Rootgrow could have been responsible for the Acer's demise? In any case i would certainly use it on your beech hedge. You have to be pretty smart to kill beech! Good luck!

  • 24/07/2018 02:08 PM
    • poppikin
    • Glorious Surrey
    • 06 Apr 2009
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    Thanks Backache. Not much doubt about the Acer. Its's dead roots were covered in it. I had the beech hedge planted from potted plants got on the Internet but the expert who planted them thought there were too many gaps so I looked for a dozen more. I got them from the local garden centre. They are "bare root" but apparently they don't sell them like that now and 10 "bare roots" are tied in a bundle but the bundle is growing in a pot of soil. Very good value I thought at £13.99. They are very dry and it's very dry here so the garden centre suggested Rootgrow. They are all planted and look fine. Thanks for help, poppikin

  • 25/07/2018 06:55 AM
    • Backache
    • W. Kent
    • 31 Dec 2012
    • 266
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    Thank you poppikin. Again, thats very interesting. I am certain the garden centre advice is sound as anything that helps with root establishment in dry conditions must be beneficial. i am sure you are already doing this but i would certainly suggest that your team of servants keep the new beech hedge well watered in this continuing hot spell!!!

  • 26/07/2018 03:27 AM
    • poppikin
    • Glorious Surrey
    • 06 Apr 2009
    • 579
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    Alas I do not have any servants Backache. I am the watering lady and I do 8 cans up a slope every morning at 6 o'clock. I did have to get a strong man to dig the holes as it is solid chalk here on the North Downs. I used the old Rootgrow and it looked fine. We are lucky with our garden centre. They have two huge modern garden centres within a couple of miles from each other all always run by a family firm so it's good old fashioned service and advice. They give 10% discount to the village horticultural club. Later today they are going to repair my wheelbarrow flat tyre. I am still impressed with the little beech plants and may get some more and grow them in pots. poppikin

  • 26/07/2018 04:18 PM
    • Backache
    • W. Kent
    • 31 Dec 2012
    • 266
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    I agree, poppikin, beech does have a lot going for it, is normally trouble free and does not resent being pruned / trimmed. Good luck with it!

  • 30/07/2018 11:05 AM
    • poppikin
    • Glorious Surrey
    • 06 Apr 2009
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    I wondered if Rootgrow would help my Lavatera? I do like it but I have not grown it successfully here in the chalk. Thanks for help poppikin

  • 31/07/2018 07:08 AM
    • Backache
    • W. Kent
    • 31 Dec 2012
    • 266
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    If you have had trouble in the past in your chalky soil i would buy a bag of top soil (reputable brand.) Dig a large hole where you wish your lavatera to be situated. Fill the hole with your new top soil. Then secure your lavatera in the new soil and, by all means, add a sprinkle of the Rootgrow. If possible use rainwater in dry spells. Good Luck with it