Skip navigation.

unhealthy looking Cotinus 'Golden Spirit'

Last post 18-09-2017 3:27 PM by Blackstart. 3 replies.

Page 1 of 1 (4 items)

  • 15/09/2017 04:56 PM
    • CamMac
    • United Kingdom
    • 25 May 2013
    • 10
    Not Ranked
    Reply | Contact

     Hi,

     I put in a Cotinus 'Golden Spirit' about a year ago, and when I put it in, the leaves were an even yellow colour and standard size. Since then, it has grown a little, but the leaves don't look particularly healthy, certainly not as they were when I planted it. They don't have an even colour, are quite small and 'crinkled'. It is in a pretty sunny spot, but I have been watering it regularly. I tried giving it some miracle-gro as well as more standard organic fertilisers (in small doses), but no change. It is growing in a bed where heather, hazel, cotoneaster, berberis and spirae, as well as grass all seem to thrive. 

    Thanks for any suggestions.

     Regards,

     Cam

  • 16/09/2017 11:07 AM
    • Blackstart
    • Warwickshire
    • 06 Dec 2010
    • 450
    Top 50 Contributor
    Reply | Contact

    Hi CamMac, this sounds a bit of a mystery. RHS list your plant a generally pest & disease free so if there is a problem, it must be down to the growing conditions. I know Cotinus do not like to be in poorly drained soil and some yellow leaved plants, although needing a sunny spot, can suffer leaf damage in very hot weather. If there is no sign of pests or diseases then the cause may well be physiological. As an aside, would be impossible to find out, but if the batch of plants yours were propagated from were poor stock plants then all of the resulting offspring are likely to be poor examples. If it were me, I would see how it goes next year and if no improvement move it to another spot or to the bin. Have you tried hard pruning to encourage larger leaves or are you leaving it unpruned for the flowers? Blackstart

  • 18/09/2017 01:59 PM
    • CamMac
    • United Kingdom
    • 25 May 2013
    • 10
    Not Ranked
    Reply | Contact

     Hi Blackstart,

     Thanks for the reply. The soil is very well drained in that location. I tend to think it is a nutrition issue in that soil. I've tried a spiraea and a chaenomeles in that spot as well, and they never did very well either. Yet there are other things around it that thrive, so I am guessing I'll just have to dig it up and stick it in a pot. The spiraea I moved as well as the chaenomeles have since done a lot better since I moved them elsewhere. Cotinus is not listed as fussy about soil pH, but it could be some trace element missing. I'll try something else there - guess it will just have to be trial and error. I have another Cotinus not far from that one in the same bed that is thriving.

     Cheers,

     

    Cam

  • 18/09/2017 03:27 PM
    • Blackstart
    • Warwickshire
    • 06 Dec 2010
    • 450
    Top 50 Contributor
    Reply | Contact

    hi Cam, what you say about previous plants not thriving is interesting. Is it possible there is an underground service running below that spot? I once worked at a place that had a long beech hedge growing very well apart from in one particular spot. Several attempts to invigorate the area were made as well as replacing the affected plant. Turned out there was a gas pipe running underneath which had a very slight leak which was causing the problem. Trace elements should be ok, very rare for them to be deficient in soil (as opposed to potting composts). Blackstart