Skip navigation.

Garden "Must Haves"

Last post 24-06-2015 3:13 PM by Julie. 18 replies.

Page 1 of 2 (19 items) 1 2 Next >

  • 20/06/2015 07:36 AM
    • Nell
    • Mid Wales
    • 19 Mar 2013
    • 138
    Top 100 Contributor
    Reply | Contact

    So .... what is it you think a garden "Must Have" Growmore expressed an opinion in the "Privet Hedge in Serious Trouble" thread. I agree that well trimmed privet hedge with neatly mown lawn is an attractive style of garden, one that I grew up with, my father was (is) very proud of his privet hedge and even used to try and time the spring trim to show of the blossom at its best. That said and although I like privet hedges I do not see it as a must - a lawn is a must, or at least a green space. Roses, yes.... and probably a lot more when I start to really think about it. Come on, folks - lets have your ideas...

  • 20/06/2015 12:14 PM
    • Nigel
    • Paignton
    • 27 May 2008
    • 455
    Top 50 Contributor
    Reply | Contact

     Let's start with a greenhouse, coldframe, shed, water supply and compost heap/heaps. Then a vegetable plot, soft fruit, boundaries either chain link fencing or brickwalls as these are low mainteneance and can be used for climbers and growing shrubs against. Then beds for plants, as many different ones as can be shoe horned in, to guive all year round interest. Lawn/grass  is just a storage area for ground waiting for conversion to beds for more plants.  

  • 20/06/2015 01:06 PM
    • Blackstart
    • Warwickshire
    • 06 Dec 2010
    • 475
    Top 50 Contributor
    Reply | Contact

    As for individual plants in an ornamental garden I would never be without Choisya ternata, an evergreen shrub of great merit with fragrant white flowers and aromatic foliage. If space allowed I would also try and fit in Amelanchier lamarckii grown as a small tree. The new leaves are a brilliant bright green followed by a profusion of white flowers around Easter time. Small cherry like fruits in summer that attract many birds who feed on them. A great show of autumn colour in the autumn that can rival some of the Acers. I’m sure I can think of more. Blackstart

  • 20/06/2015 06:34 PM
    • Backache
    • W. Kent
    • 31 Dec 2012
    • 273
    Top 50 Contributor
    Reply | Contact

    This is an first class and very stimulating thread. Well done Nell. In addition to the excellent advice by the previous post people I would certainly add the whole range of Daphne's. as well as the newest varieties of Magnolia including the excellent Genie. I would also include golden yew. I replaced an old leylandii 20 metre hedge with golden yew a few years back. It has taken a few years, ( it is very, very, very slow,) but the result is magnificent and just requires a simple clipping once a year.

  • 20/06/2015 07:14 PM
    • kaydee
    • Perthshire
    • 15 Feb 2009
    • 634
    Top 25 Contributor
    Reply | Contact

    A greenhouse with a tap yes, A shed to store what the rest of my family is pleased to refer to as 'your junk', A hose that DOES NOT KINK. A lawn - perhaps that depends on family life style. We got rid of ours & never regretted it. Favourite plants change with the season. Always so pleased to see the first aconite & snowdrops but then comes the fritillaries & luscious tulips, iris, centranthus, abutilons & lilies followed by glorious fuchsias that go on until the frosts. Which one would I want in my dessert island garden? I just don't know. It is perhaps the ever changing variety that is the joy. I could live without bedding plants. Yes, thank you Nell. It is a super thread.

  • 20/06/2015 10:50 PM
    • Nell
    • Mid Wales
    • 19 Mar 2013
    • 138
    Top 100 Contributor
    Reply | Contact

    Gosh... that is a luxury garden Nigel. I love the idea that lawn/grass is a storage area for ground. I have never thought of it like that, but when I look back over previous gardens that is exactly what has happened, the lawn has shrunk as the beds have grown.... and it is happening again!

  • 20/06/2015 10:51 PM
    • Nell
    • Mid Wales
    • 19 Mar 2013
    • 138
    Top 100 Contributor
    Reply | Contact

    Kaydee, have you achieved the hose that does not kink?

  • 20/06/2015 10:59 PM
    • Nell
    • Mid Wales
    • 19 Mar 2013
    • 138
    Top 100 Contributor
    Reply | Contact

    Backache ... not my idea, Growmore suggested it really! I am amazed at what is coming up and it all started from lawns and privet. I also like the golden yew. We have 3 columnar golden yews (planted by previous owners) which look lovely and as you say slow growing so require little maintenance to retain their shape. Another property of yew I appreciate is its ability to create new growth from old wood when it is exposed to the light, unlike leylandii!!

  • 21/06/2015 07:27 AM
    • Backache
    • W. Kent
    • 31 Dec 2012
    • 273
    Top 50 Contributor
    Reply | Contact

    Nell. Agree absolutely with what you say about Golden Yew. Maybe the clippings are poisonous to cattle but in every other respect it is vastly superior to Leylandii (provided you have the patience of course). I, too, have the columnar types. both the Standishii and the Fastigiata aureum. All are now over 20 years old and do look spectacular. The Blackbirds love their red berries in the autumn. A sunny position is imperative though to maintain the rich golden colouring. My neighbour put three in, all in the shade, and they just look like basic Irish yews

  • 22/06/2015 12:09 AM
    • GROWMORE
    • London
    • 12 Aug 2012
    • 736
    Top 25 Contributor
    Reply | Contact

     Following on from Backache. This thread has the potential of drawing us closer together. Sharing our thoughts and ideas.

     

    No Joke.  If I was ever asked to describe a person, without ever having met them before.  I would take a look at their garden, taking that they had a garden.  To me.  A garden is like a mirror.  It refects so many things about the owner.

    It has been suggested, such, 'must have's'.  Please consider these points.  A greenhouse.  So, will it be some kind of status symbol, or are you likely to make full use of it and propogate most of your own plants.  A compost heap and such. In all honesty.  Most of us have tiny postage stamp sized gardens.  Do we have enough waste to warrant a compost heap?  Then the veggie patch.  I have to agree home produce is the best.  At todays market prices and the vast availability of most produce.  Is it really worth all the labour and expence and the heart-breaks following a bad season.

    My vision here is.  This forum is sadly lacking members and support.  Please let us not frighten off prospective members by more or less say, this is what you need.

     

    IMHO.  Your garden, if you and the latter are close.  The garden as I say is a mirror reflection of YOU.  My advice to a complete newbie would be.  Take it steady.  Keep an open mind.  Listen to all given advice.  Then decide.  Don't try and do everything at once.

    I would love to relate my own experience.  Re: getting a new garden. 

    Growmore.
  • 22/06/2015 12:20 AM
    • GROWMORE
    • London
    • 12 Aug 2012
    • 736
    Top 25 Contributor
    Reply | Contact

     Nell.  From your comment Re;  what is coming up.  Forgive me please.  Whilst I was typing my comment a couple of other posts were entered.

    Please, and I mean this with all sincerity.  If at anytime I offend a member by my comment.  Please say so.

    Regards.  Mike. 

    Growmore.
  • 22/06/2015 07:18 AM
    • Nigel
    • Paignton
    • 27 May 2008
    • 455
    Top 50 Contributor
    Reply | Contact

     Greenhouse as status symbol really? Never thought of them like that. They're were you go to garden when the weathers bad and you need to get out the house or listen to the radio. My greenhouse is invariably not big enough for what I want to do. As for a compost heap, given the amount some councils charge for greenwaste then yes a compost heap or a wormery is needed. 

    Is the veggie patch worth the expense effort and heartbreak, yes; it's not that expensive, the labour is free and it's not that much hard work.

     

  • 22/06/2015 08:34 PM
    • Blackstart
    • Warwickshire
    • 06 Dec 2010
    • 475
    Top 50 Contributor
    Reply | Contact

    Hi Mike, I know exactly what you mean. My non-gardening brother in law & sister in law had their back garden designed and landscaped a couple of years ago which included a smalll circular greenhouse which my SiL wanted. I asked her what she was going to grow/use it for and she said she hadn't thought that far ahead yet, but all of her friends have one. Unfortunately she and her husband are not practical gardeners and the greenhouse still remains as a focal point but empty. Each to their own. blackstart

  • 22/06/2015 08:55 PM
    • Nell
    • Mid Wales
    • 19 Mar 2013
    • 138
    Top 100 Contributor
    Reply | Contact

    My greenhouse is home to a frog .... as well as growing tomatoes, cucumber and hopefully aubergine. I haven't tried these before ..... earlier this year it was full of seedlings of all sorts of things which have now gone out into the garden. It IS very stylish and was certainly one of the features that attracted me to the house .... but so much more than at status symbol!!!!

  • 22/06/2015 08:59 PM
    • Nell
    • Mid Wales
    • 19 Mar 2013
    • 138
    Top 100 Contributor
    Reply | Contact

    A real must - and I am sure no-one could disagree - is somewhere to sit and admire. It could be a fancy bench or seat, or more often than not in our garden it is the low wall in front of the rockery or the doorstep. From both these places we can see the garden and some of the views beyond as we have a well earned cuppa.