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Grape vine died back

Last post 25-09-2013 8:06 PM by poppy1. 11 replies.

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  • 06/09/2013 10:14 AM
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    I inherited a large grape vine with our house, and it's produced wonderful lush foliage for the past two years.  A couple of weeks ago all the leaves suddenly dried up and dropped off, which doesn't usually happen until the first frosts.  I've treated it no differently than the last two years, and there's no signs or damage or disease.

    I can't decide whether to take it out now, or hope the roots are still alive and see if it recovers in spring.  Can vines go into shock, and come back?  Or is more likely to be truly dead?  Does anyone know how I can tell?

    Thanks.

  • 06/09/2013 01:25 PM
    • Minnie77uk
    • Chesterfield
    • 18 May 2012
    • 315
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    Maybe you could try scraping a very small patch off the bark at a low point in the trunk or branches and see if there is any sign of green?

  • 06/09/2013 03:17 PM
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    Thanks Minnie, I'd checked that and the vine stem's dead.  That's why I was wondering if the roots and the bole just above them might have survived.  I have no real experience with vines, but I know they can be very hardy.

  • 06/09/2013 11:18 PM
    • GROWMORE
    • London
    • 12 Aug 2012
    • 736
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    Hello friend.

    GROWMORE is not a fruity person.  Fogive the pun.  However The previous subscriber has put forth a reasonabl explantation. Thjis minor test will at least tel you, if yolur stock is under threat.

    Growmore.
  • 07/09/2013 05:13 PM
    • Minnie77uk
    • Chesterfield
    • 18 May 2012
    • 315
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    If this was my vine, I think I'd feed it and give it a little winter protection and a quick talking to (as our future king does) and then keep fingers crossed for green shoots next year.

    I assume nothing has changed near the vine or that it is near drains that could be leaking poisons to its roots?

    Let's hope all is well and your vine comes back next year. Good luck!

  • 07/09/2013 10:19 PM
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    That's kind fo you, thanks.  I'll give it some TLC and one last chance!

  • 08/09/2013 01:57 PM
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    Hi. I bought a grape vine, neglected it, and left it out over the very cold winter we had a year or two back. For the next year, it looked like a three sticks in a pot. Brown, dry, and, to all intents and purposes, dead. I paid it no further attention until the 2nd spring after the winter when I thought I had killed it. Small shoots began to appear on one of the 'sticks'. It has continued it's miraculous recovery and is now a sizeable and fairly lush plant. I would say to give it some time.

  • 25/09/2013 08:09 AM
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    Thanks for the tip, I hope mine is as hardy as yours! 

  • 25/09/2013 08:38 AM
    • poppy1
    • france
    • 04 Sep 2013
    • 100
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     Just leave the vine roots alone, "But" give them a really good mulch (this will keep frost off the roots)

     

    Remove all dead growth of the vine and any long bits as these will only attract the wind and the wind and snow etc will not do the vine any good,,

    come spring you'll see new life come into the vine, its now a good feed is needed, and the mulch kept up, 

    the mulch now acts to keep the roots from drying out in the hot weather,

    the reason your vine is the way it is is all due to the wet spring and late summer, a lot of plum trees have not given good fruit crops this year due to the the same weather conditions, "cherry prices are high again due to weather conditions keeping crops poor and harvest low.

    My own vine grows under the front of house kitchen window and has three rose bushes around and near it plus a fennel plant, so it's both well protected from the weather and as the french grape growers do (I have the rose to show me if any pest's are around) I keep an eye on the roses to see what if any problems are around, if the roses look sad or covered in greenfly It's time to act,

    If ever your driving through france and you see grape vines growing in fields "line after line of vine you'll see a rose bush every other line growing, the rose'e are for a warning to the grower of pests.

    Now the roses's over the arch leading onto my lawn have not flowered as much as last year, (weather again).

    So dont beat yourself up just yet but as im always saying why not treat yourself to a book ref grape growing and see just what you can do to help your grape vine,

    It,ll be money well spent.

  • 25/09/2013 05:10 PM
    • Minnie77uk
    • Chesterfield
    • 18 May 2012
    • 315
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    As in France, so too in New Zealand where I also saw roses growing at the end of each row of vines.  They also add some colour to the endless greenery!

  • 25/09/2013 07:04 PM
    • jackie
    • SW France
    • 15 Apr 2005
    • 98
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    Bear in mind that if your vine has been grafted and it does shoot again from the base it could be from the rootstock. It will still be a vine (we call it 'the American' because the American vines were resistant to the phylloxera aphid that caused the near collapse of the French wine industry in the 19th century) but will not be the grape you had originally.

    jackie hamblen
  • 25/09/2013 08:06 PM
    • poppy1
    • france
    • 04 Sep 2013
    • 100
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    Something ive not thought of saying in my reply but may help others to understand why the grape vines suffering,

    It's not the rain or the heat thats the main problem, its the fact that bees etc wont pollinate when the weathers not right, and due to the very late spring and then the excess rain and the summer staring so late the pollination was'nt good,

    We all have clocks or time devices in our homes "well so mother nature has her times for things that must be done and if that times missed!! Im sorry to say the vine, early plum trees revert back to closing down and this is whats happening here, pollination poor.