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Pruning "New Dawn" climbing rose ?

Last post 31-07-2013 12:14 AM by Panthera. 6 replies.

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  • 18/07/2013 09:11 AM
    • Panthera
    • Chester
    • 16 Jul 2013
    • 4
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    I purchased my climbing rose in the Autumn of last year, from a Supermarket. Unfortunately, due to many other demands, it stayed in its pot until a week ago .I did prune it in the early spring but it was pruned without my having the knowledge of how to prune it. Considering its limited environment it has grown well in the pot and I've now planted it into a large tub . I have absolutely no idea how to prune this rose, bearing in mind it's present shape. I have read some of the advice on pruning but it doesn't seem applicable due to it's shape:- It has one four and a half foot main stem with 3 roses near the top. It has a lower two and a half foot stem with 2 roses. Not a good look- very sparse . I have secured both stems to wires in the wall. I know that I shouldn't be pruning it at this time of year but it does require a "knowledgeable intervention" at some point. I would really appreciate your comments.

  • 18/07/2013 09:55 AM
    • Clematis
    • Biggar, South Lanarkshire, Scotland.
    • 30 Jun 2008
    • 242
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     Welcome Panthera - I think I read somewhere that you don't prune till its second year but have a look at this site on RHS for exact info on New Dawn and there's a link from there to pruning.

     

    Some advice says prune from November onwards but I don't prune till Spring usually because of our winters. I don't have New Dawn but have a few other climbing roses where I usually prune out any weak, dead or dying stems and shorten stems to about 18inches or so from the base to leave a few good strong outward facing buds.  I also try to tie them horizontally so the buds will "break" and form more shoots from there.  Hopefully someone with New Dawn will be able to advise you and any rose growers on the site will correct any mistakes I'm making.

     

    http://apps.rhs.org.uk/plantselector/plant?plantid=1697

    Clematis
  • 18/07/2013 10:49 AM
    • Panthera
    • Chester
    • 16 Jul 2013
    • 4
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    Many thanks,Clematis.Your suggestions will be really helpful. Panthera

  • 19/07/2013 09:00 AM
    • Valerian
    • South Essex
    • 20 Jun 2010
    • 577
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     Hello Panthera and welcome to the forums. I have Rosa 'New Dawn' in my garden. One is over fifty years old and and some are new replacements for ones that have died. The rose isn't a climbe rbut a rambler. This means that in the first year the stems should be gently lowered to a position from which new stems can grow vertically. These are the flower bearing stems for next year. At the end of year two these stems are pruned back to allow a new framework of stems to grow and produce flowers during the next year and so the cycle continues.

     If these seems a bit complicated don't worry, they are very forgiving and can take care of them selves. I have one plant happily rambling through a Hawthorn tree. The flowers are currently 15 feet in the air, beyond my reach to prune, so I intend to let it do its pwn thing and prune out any diseased or dying stems as I see them. It isn't fed or watered by me and seems very healthy.

     Good luck with them and enjoy your garden.

  • 19/07/2013 06:26 PM
    • Panthera
    • Chester
    • 16 Jul 2013
    • 4
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    Hello Valerian Thank you for your comments. Your New Dawn seems to be exceedingly self maintaining - how wonderful! I will bear in mind what you have suggested about the stems.My understanding is that you lower the side stems to a horizontal position rather than allowing them to grow vertically? They can then be tied to one of the supporting wires and their horizontal aspect will encourage new shoots to form along their length ? These shoots can also be trained into a horizontal position, when they have reached sufficient length? Is that correct? So many questions. I just need to get things clear in my mind. Thanks again.

  • 20/07/2013 01:31 PM
    • Valerian
    • South Essex
    • 20 Jun 2010
    • 577
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     Hello Panthera,

    These roses are wonderfully forgiving. You can do exactly what you describe. The rose will grow well however you prune it. Feed it and spray with a blackspot preventative (even though I don't) and it will delight you for years. I've copied this for you.  

    How to prune climbing roses Back to top

    Formative training and pruning of young climbing roses

    Climbing roses are not self-clinging and need supports of trellis or horizontal wires to which the shoots can be tied. 

    • Set the lowest wire 45cm (18in) off the ground and space subsequent wires 30cm (1ft) apart 
    • If training roses up pillars, arches or pergolas, twist the main shoots gently around the uprights, keeping them as horizontal as possible, to encourage flowering shoots to form low down
    • If the main stems are slow to branch, tip-prune them to the first strong bud to encourage side shoots, otherwise leave them to fill the available space
    • Remove dead, damaged, diseased or spindly growth, and deadhead during the flowering season to encourage further flowering

    Routine pruning of climbing roses

    • First remove dead, diseased or dying branches
    • Then tie in any new shoots needed to fill supports
    • Prune any flowered side shoots back by two thirds of their length
    • If the plant is heavily congested, cut out any really old branches from the base to promote new growth

    Renovating overgrown climbing roses

    • Remove all dead, diseased, dying and weak shoots
    • Cut some of the old woody branches to the ground, retaining a maximum of six young, vigorous stems that can be secured to supports
    • Saw away any dead stumps at the base of the plant, where rain can collect and encourage rot
    • Shorten side shoots on the remaining branches and prune back the tips by one third to one half, to encourage branching
    • Give pruned plants a boost in the following spring by spreading a granular rose fertiliser over the soil and mulch them with a 5cm (2in) layer of garden compost or well rotted manure

  • 31/07/2013 12:14 AM
    • Panthera
    • Chester
    • 16 Jul 2013
    • 4
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    Thank you Valerian. You have been very helpful.