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Ground cover plants

Last post 17-06-2012 10:05 PM by veggie perin. 4 replies.

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  • 16/06/2012 02:45 PM
    • veggie perin
    • United Kingdom
    • 16 Jun 2012
    • 2
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    Hello this is my first posting on your forum, I hope to be participating on a very regular basis, with many questions and hopefully a few answers to others problems. I recently had a career change, trained in horticulture and professional gardening and was fortunate enough to be appointed as head gardener in an estate in the west of Scotland. I still have vast amounts to learn, but I am enjoying this learning experience very much. As the estate is fairly large, I am looking at ways of saving time, and ground cover plantings,seems like a good alternative to weeding. What are your favourite/ most effective ground cover plants....your input would be greatly appreciated.

  • 16/06/2012 05:03 PM
    • Susiq
    • Northumberland
    • 16 Feb 2008
    • 3,126
    Top 10 Contributor
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    Welcome VP - love your monika!!! Sounds like you have a lot of gardening on your hands.

    I am trying Juniperus Horizontalis for the first time this year, for a part of the garden that I really haven't got time to tend to, so is too early for me to comment on its success. Would love to hear what specimens you find effective.

  • 16/06/2012 08:55 PM
    • 07 Nov 2006
    • 2,418
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    Hi Veggie P.

    Seems a little odd, one with your qualifications asking this kind of hepl.  Never mind.  Good to make your aquaintance.  Please email if I can help further.

     

    GROUND COVER PLANTS

     

     

    Acaena. Ajuga. Aubrieta. Bergenia. Brunnera. Cornus. Cotoneaster. Dianthus. Dryas.

    Euonymus. Gaultheria. Geranium. Helianthemum. Helexine. Hosta. Hypericum.

    Juniperus. Lamium. Mahonia. Oxalis. Pachysandra. Phlox. Polygonum. Potentilla.

    Pulmonaria. Saponaria. Saxifraga. Sedum. Stachys. Telima. Thymus. Tiarella.

    Tolmiea. Vaccinium. Veronica. Vinca.

     

     

  • 17/06/2012 08:53 PM
    • Snark
    • Suffolk
    • 12 Jan 2011
    • 380
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    The problem with ground cover plants (so called)is that many of them wont cover well enough to blot out weeds so you finish up with weeds growing all tangled with what was supposed to be helping.The really good ones are thugs which then need some control in their own right.I'm in the dry of East Anglia on alkaline clay but most of the above list would be NBG for me. Periwinkles (vinca) are not bad. Ivies in areas where you can control them with a strimmer.Cotoneaster horizontalis is good.I have a super rose red max graf which has taken over a wild corner and smothers everything flowering like mad every year with no feed,pruning or other attention.I had quite a phase with ground cover roses planted over weedstop mulch. Most were useless but the other good one was pheasant which has not only covered many square meters of bank but has also climbed 6 meters into an apple tree and is a bit of a nightmare to control.Best of all are the hardy geraniums.The fancy ones all revert to various shades of pink but they smother all known weeds,look reasonable,can be strimmed but clumps can be dug out reasonably well when they pop up in the wrong places. They self seed everywhere but you cant have everything.

    For the Snark was a boojum you see
  • 17/06/2012 10:05 PM
    • veggie perin
    • United Kingdom
    • 16 Jun 2012
    • 2
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    Thanks for taking the time to  list your likes/dislikes in groundcover plants, I agree, that many of them only partly cover and allow grass/ weeds to grow through them, I also agree with you (Snark), that the hardy geraniums are hard to beat; I am trying some 'ground cover roses' this year, but don't have red max graf, but I will certainly check it out for future use. It's great seeing how different people from different parts of the country approach problems in different ways, and you're never too old to learn new tricks or adapt old ideas. thanks again for you're input, if any others have other preferences, please let us know....regards Veggie P