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leylandii

Last post 04-01-2013 8:18 AM by David. 20 replies.

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  • 18/07/2009 10:42 AM
    • rabiddog
    • Llandrindod wells
    • 18 Jul 2009
    • 2
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    hello people

     i was looking for advice on how to grow my own leylandii hedge from scratch eg: cutting. as i have just moved to a 2  bed concil house with a huge garden which is on a busy road i have asked to concil to erect a 6 foot fence but all they are willing do is put up a 3 foot chain link which is what there now im not a neighbour from hell i would like some privicy for my family during the summers to come i know the hedge will take a few year to grow

     

     

    atb darren

  • 18/07/2009 12:01 PM
    • Digger
    • Northern UK
    • 18 Jul 2005
    • 5,230
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    Why have you chosen leylandii as a hedge? they are a nuisance to look after properly and the devils work to prune. Also they are good at extracting nutrients and water from the ground, at the expense of surrounding plants, the leylandii are not very good at supporting native wildlife, they do have a value in certain circumstances but rarely in domestic situations. You could plant privet or a mixed native hedgerow that will give you privacy without inconveinience, your new neighbours may not appreciate a leylandii hedge because of their awful reputation and the obvious downfalls of having them in the neighbourhood. Beech hedges are nice and easy to maintain,and if you prune them to keep them juvenile they will hold onto their leaves all winter.

    Think carefully and step back from the brink of madness before it's too late

    digger Devil Sage of the fells
  • 18/07/2009 12:08 PM
    • Susiq
    • Northumberland
    • 16 Feb 2008
    • 3,126
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    Agree totally with Digger on all counts - so definately not good in domestic situations. We are lucky enough to be more or less in the middle of nowhere our Leylandii are about 50 feet tall down one side of the garden that backs onto the farmers field. It costs us a small fortune to have them kept in check professionally, as they are too big to do ourselves.

  • 18/07/2009 10:35 PM
    • rabiddog
    • Llandrindod wells
    • 18 Jul 2009
    • 2
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    Beech hedges  hows fast will the grow and how high k i have aboutr a 125 feet to hedge how many plants would one need

  • 18/07/2009 10:40 PM
    • Digger
    • Northern UK
    • 18 Jul 2005
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    If you leave a beech hedge unpruned it will grow into a very large collection of trees indeed, however they respond well to say two prunings per year,which is what mine gets and it's at 6 feet tall, leylandii if left unattended can grow enormous also and cannot be reigned in easily, I planted my beech trees as little bare rooted specimens two feet apart, They can be bought quite cheaply to be planted in bare root form in Autumn, pot grown specimens will probably cost you more, In the back of most gardening magazines are advertisements for hedging plants,you can buy all sorts of trees mixed or single species,but do shop around before you make a decision.

    digger Devil Sage of the fells
  • 19/07/2009 08:50 AM
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    Don't take any notice of 'em - Leyland cypress is a great hedge for a skilled gardener. Just take cuttings now thusly: Take 20-25cm cuttings of young vigorous shoots from the top of an existing hedge in early September, trim off bottom third of foliage, dip in rooting hormone, place in grity rooting media, cover with polythene - should have rooted by spring and be ready to pot up/grow on in nursery bed ready to go to final hedge a year later. Boggy

    Beware the bat-eared bogweevil
  • 19/07/2009 09:39 AM
    • David
    • Sevenoaks
    • 11 May 2009
    • 98
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     I share my opinions with Mr Digger. I know we do not all like the same things otherwise we would all be driving red Fords but I consider them to be the Ventnors of the gardening world. They are hard work to maintain, the prunings stink, do not compost properly, look uncouth, prone to dieback, if over trimmed do not regrow etc etc etc. Someone told me recently thay are now illegal in Eire. Why not consider Thuja plicata or if you have got time yew (taxus) preferaby a golden type.

    But I am not a Horticultural Technician

    Member 29971
  • 19/07/2009 10:41 AM
    • Digger
    • Northern UK
    • 18 Jul 2005
    • 5,230
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    Ha ha, Excellent! I wouldn't be surprised if they were illegal in many countries, the use I thought of was, when they built the motorway here, they planted up the embankment with native trees, leylandii were used to shelter the young trees from traffic dirt etc.. Then the leylandii were cut down and eradicated like they should be. I do suppose if you are a skilled gardener who has nothing better to do with their time,and you don't mind your garden being drained and sapped of all it's nutrients and of course you are not only skilled but very anti social and miserable and care not for other peoples enjoyment of neighbouring property, and if you like the local people to despise you then leylandii are a first class choice! indeed they are the ventnors of the gardening world,an excellent comparison my friend. Susiq has leylandii for a legitimate reason and they don't affect the neighbours (because they haven't any) but in a domestic situation,where you've just moved into a new neighbourhood planting horrible Leylandii is asking to become the local pariah. Children will knock on your door and run away every night, people will deposit unsanitary items among the hedge, unwanted fridge freezers and the like will accumulate in the hedge. It's not as though ignorance can be used as an excuse anymore, these weeds have plagued the nation for years and everyone is aware of their negative impact on the planet we call Earth,

    digger Devil Sage of the fells
  • 19/07/2009 10:58 AM
    • Arrem
    • Staffordshire. UK
    • 12 Jul 2009
    • 243
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     So, Leylandii or Marmite?  both have the same effect, ie you either love them or hate them.

    Yes they grow quick, and will provide the privacy you seek but they cannot be left to their own devices.  You will have to attend to them once they get to the desired height.  They do have a way of sneaking up on you too!  Before you know it they are 10 feet or more.

    Having grown them, and regretted it, my advice is, please think twice before growing a Leylandii hedge.  Why not put up some proper 6ft fencing?  It can be painted any colour you like and will enhance your garden by providing a plain backdrop to your planting.

    The real benefit I noticed once I took the Leylandii out again, was the amount of light they had "sucked" out of the garden. Mine were only 6 feet high but the garden was so mich brighter and fresher once they had gone.

    There is no such thing as useless - you can always be a bad example.
  • 19/07/2009 11:50 AM
    • Digger
    • Northern UK
    • 18 Jul 2005
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    Well said old fruit, when I moved here some dimwit had planted the blasted leylandii all the way round the perimeter of the back garden, the hedge was fifteen feet high!!!! the lawn was yellow and nothing else grew only the leylandii, we had them removed pronto by professional tree cutters. The garden soon recovered and sprang into life once the trees were gone, and the neighbours were all delighted by our common sense approach to the awful problem

    digger Devil Sage of the fells
  • 19/07/2009 12:42 PM
    • Susiq
    • Northumberland
    • 16 Feb 2008
    • 3,126
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    Ditto! For the first time I think Boggy has lost the plotWink - or he would do - if he planted a load of the damned things!!!!

    Love the image Digger has drawn up of abandoned old fridges etc., - can't say you haven't been warned!

  • 19/07/2009 02:05 PM
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    The bogweevil knows when and where to plant Leyland cypress hedges and how to manage them to get their attractive mossy finish, and he knows where they are unsuitable.

     

    Boggy

    Beware the bat-eared bogweevil
  • 19/07/2009 03:33 PM
    • David
    • Sevenoaks
    • 11 May 2009
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     I have been trying to remember how many Leylandii hedges there are in RHS Wisley......  Maybe I need an intensive course of Blueberries?. They are supposed to be good for the memory

    Member 29971
  • 19/07/2009 03:43 PM
    • Digger
    • Northern UK
    • 18 Jul 2005
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    I am sure the bogweevil knows what to do with leylandii, but in the wrong hands they are a menace, my bluberry crop is spectacular this year david, but i don't know if the old memory has improved? Perhaps leylandii sales and ownership should be restricted? the problem probably started when they became widely available and "chavs" got hold of them, on your point David I wonder if any of the RHS gardens have leylandii planted in them? I certainly wouldn't expect the esteemed Wisley to have such vulgar specimens in there

    digger Devil Sage of the fells
  • 22/07/2009 05:16 PM
    • bigsusan55
    • North-West London
    • 14 May 2009
    • 144
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     Wisley have got some very nice Leylandii hedges (or had when I last went there), but the point is that they need very regular maintenance - you can't wait until they are the height that you want before trimming them, or they end up all tufty.  And if you every once miss the maintenance, you've had it - you can never make them look good again.

    Both Wisley and Capel Manor (Enfield) used to have demo hedges - look before you plant.  I haven't been to either lately so don't know if they are still there.  The Capel Manor ones were half left unpruned so that you could see what happens - spectacular/frightening in some cases!

    You could consider a "fedge" if you want to screen quickly but have less maintenance.  You would have to extend your wire fence upwards and then grow climbers through it.  Loads of climbers will take well to this.  In another post I recommended Euonymus - it takes well from cuttings and is evergreen.  You could then grow the odd more ornamental plant along the length.