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Lupins

Last post 29-06-2009 10:02 PM by Digger. 5 replies.

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  • 27/06/2009 07:00 PM
    • Virgoboy
    • 27 Jun 2009
    • 2
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    Can Anyone tell me what i can do with the lupin pods that are left after it has flowered?

  • 28/06/2009 12:35 PM
    • Kesira
    • Elkesley, Nottinghamshire
    • 15 Jun 2009
    • 33
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     If you wait until they turn brown and 'crispy' then you can use the seeds inside the pods to grow more.  If you don't have the inclination/ammenieties to spend time sowing and propogating the seeds, then just lay the 'rippened' stalks down on the ground where you would like them to grow and leave them to it.  Although you won't get each one to grow into a plant that way, a few may grow and then you have free plants with no effort.  

    If you do decide that you would like to collect the seeds then collect them up into a paper bag, fairly large so that they get air circulation.  hang them up in the garage or a shed then once they are totally dried out, remove the seeds from the pods and put into an envelope or something else paper to keep them until you are ready to give them away, swap them or grow them yourself.  I've been told that keeping seeds in the fridge keeps them well until you are ready to propogate, i've not tried this myself though yet.

    Gardening Tip
    When weeding, the best way to make sure you are removing a weed and not a valuable plant is to pull on it. If it comes out of the ground easily, it was a valuable plant.
  • 28/06/2009 12:52 PM
    • Virgoboy
    • 27 Jun 2009
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    Thank you

  • 28/06/2009 07:37 PM
    • Peggy
    • Vermont, USA
    • 28 Jun 2009
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    I have lupines which thrive here in the Northeast Kingdom of VT (USA) - mostly by self-seeding. That is they drop their own seeds when the pod is thoroughly dry & before I cut them down-either way- If I'm doing the seeding, I drop the pod & all wherever I want lupines and there they are in Spring. Seeds need wintering-over.  They're a most care-free & strong spirited perennial!

  • 29/06/2009 09:54 PM
    • doveof
    • United Kingdom
    • 29 Jun 2009
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    If I leave the pods as you suggest and lucky enough to seed will they produce flowering plants next year and will they remain true to form? Doveof.

  • 29/06/2009 10:02 PM
    • Digger
    • Northern UK
    • 18 Jul 2005
    • 5,230
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    Hello Doveof, You will be lucky to get the same colour flowers from open pollinated seed, but if you sow them straight away and have somewhere to over winter the plants you may get them to flower nextt season, I have some lovely lupins grown from seed, and if you feed them and keep them well they are very good sturdy plants in a couple of seasons, but as you probably know lupins aren't know for their longevity and will need replacing after a few seasons.

    digger Devil Sage of the fells