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Yellowing Leaves on a Lemon Tree

Last post 02-02-2009 8:39 PM by EasyManHugo. 10 replies.

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  • 30/01/2009 12:18 PM
    • EasyManHugo
    • Shropshire
    • 30 Jan 2009
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    Can anybody help with my lemon tree. I recieved it as a gift 12 months ago. It has produced one lemon which my wife transformed into a beautiful lemon tart. The leaves have had a yellow fringing for some time now. However it seems to be getting worse. I usually let the pot dry out between waterings and have been using citrus feed in accordance with the instructions. Any suggections would be welcome

     

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  • 01/02/2009 02:52 PM
    • Suzie
    • Oxfordshire
    • 01 Jun 2008
    • 82
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    it is could be low in either nitrogen, managese or iron - I would start with a good alround feed and see if it improves from that.

    http://piskiespatch.blogspot.co.uk/
  • 01/02/2009 06:55 PM
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    your tap water may be too alkaline. try using cooled down boiled water from the kettle to see if that improves the ph of the soil, which will help the plant absorb the nutrients; citrus like a slightly acid growing medium. it could also be just natural die off of a few older leaves, which will drop off and new leaves should regenerate in spring.

  • 01/02/2009 06:56 PM
    • Suzie
    • Oxfordshire
    • 01 Jun 2008
    • 82
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    I guess the other question is - what compost do you have it growing in?

    http://piskiespatch.blogspot.co.uk/
  • 01/02/2009 07:53 PM
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    More light, more feed - if it is in a centrally heated room or an unheated conservatory you have a problem. Boggy

    Beware the bat-eared bogweevil
  • 01/02/2009 09:41 PM
    • EasyManHugo
    • Shropshire
    • 30 Jan 2009
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    Hi Suzie

    Normal potting compost with a handfull of perlite to improve drainage.

     

  • 01/02/2009 09:45 PM
    • EasyManHugo
    • Shropshire
    • 30 Jan 2009
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    Hi Bogweevil

    It's in my lounge on a south facing window cill. The room is centrally heated. So what's the problem?

     EMH

  • 02/02/2009 07:30 AM
    • Suzie
    • Oxfordshire
    • 01 Jun 2008
    • 82
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    >>>So what's the problem?

    I still reckon it is a nutrient deficiency that it is having to cope with and it should be ericaceous compost.

    Here is a clip that may help:

    The trees should be fed weekly when in growth with a citrus fertiliser (high in trace elements). Use Summer formulation from March to September inclusive, and the Winter formulation fortnightly throughout the rest of the year.

    If citrus food is not available, then a seaweed based fertiliser is adequate if supplemented with the occasional dose of sequestrated iron and trace elements when any yellowing of the leaves occurs. Foliar feeding can also be helpful in correcting deficiencies. Too much feed will lead to scorching of the leaf tips, and it is a good idea to wash the compost through with lots of water once in Summer and again in Autumn to avoid a build up of fertiliser salts..

    The ideal pH is 5-5.5, so a slightly acid (ericaceous) compost is beneficial.

    http://piskiespatch.blogspot.co.uk/
  • 02/02/2009 09:05 AM
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    Your poor old plant is under stress - the south-facing windowsill bit is OK, but the warmth and dryness of central heating coupled with the inevitably low light level of the windowsill means the plant is unbalanced.

    If you can move the plant to an equally bright, but cooler, frost-free unheated area and go easy on the water.  This will get the plant back into balance.  There is little need to feed in winter when the plant is growing poorly.

    Also check the roots by tipping the plant out of the pot - if rotted, dark and dead, repot into a smaller pot with fresh multipurpose compost.  If sound, leave re-potting until April. Repotting will set the plant up well for the summer.

    In summer it will do much better if you place it outdoors and feed every fortnight with citrus or other high nitrogen feed.

     On the plus side there appears to be little leaf loss which is a very good sign.  A certain amount of yellowing is unsurprising given the circumstances - it will receover when you can improve growing conditions.

    Boggy

     

    Beware the bat-eared bogweevil
  • 02/02/2009 08:37 PM
    • EasyManHugo
    • Shropshire
    • 30 Jan 2009
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  • 02/02/2009 08:39 PM
    • EasyManHugo
    • Shropshire
    • 30 Jan 2009
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    Thanks folks

     

    I wil try your suggestions. I going to move to a cooler position and test the ph of the soil. will report back when any changes occur.

     

    Mant Thanks

    EMH