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Can I grow a tree peony from seeds from my existing plant and if so, how?!

Last post 17-06-2008 7:49 PM by bogweevil. 6 replies.

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  • 17/06/2008 09:54 AM
    • debs1963
    • kent
    • 17 Jun 2008
    • 3
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    Hello all. Have just signed up this morning as I thought this would be the best place to come for advice. I have a tree peony in my garden which I bought 3 years ago when it was in bloom. It didnt flower the 2nd year at all but this year we've had 2 georgous blooms, with another on the way. The 2 blooms which have now died back have left huge seed pods, and am wondering whether I could use these to grow on.  If so, when is the best time to harvest the seeds and how best can I look after them from then on?  Can someone please advise!

    According to the label, which I left on the plant (most unlike me !), the variety is a Higurashi.

     

  • 17/06/2008 10:59 AM
    • sue1002
    • Ipswich, Suffolk
    • 06 Sep 2005
    • 9,675
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     Yes, you can sow the seeds but the plants you get from them probably won't be the same as the parent, there is a bit of info here

    sue1002
  • 17/06/2008 11:13 AM
    • debs1963
    • kent
    • 17 Jun 2008
    • 3
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    Thanks Sue, I had seen some info on the site but not that page.  Am assuming that I leave the seed pods on the plant until i can see signs of them opening? If anyone could advise that would be great 

  • 17/06/2008 11:16 AM
    • sue1002
    • Ipswich, Suffolk
    • 06 Sep 2005
    • 9,675
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    Thats right debs, the seeds will be ripe and ready for collection once the pods begin to open.  The seeds can then be stored somewhere dry until you need them. 

    sue1002
  • 17/06/2008 04:58 PM
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    Peony seed is especially interesting - it has 'double dormancy' needing a dose of summer warmth to initiate a root followed by a little winter cold to to get a shoot going..  Sow it fresh in pots as soon as the seed pods split (it goes horribly dormant if allowed to dry and get hard) and let it stay warm and moist in the sun into autumn (this breaks the first dormancy), and then let it experience winter cold in a cold frame or some such (to break the second dormancy).  But it may not germinate as such the first year and may need a bit more warmth in the following summer when it will produce a root, but after the second winter it will send up a shoot.

    Clever gardeners put the seed in a plastic bag with moist vermiculite or sand and leave it in a warm place until a root forms, then into the fridge for three months (checking for shoot formation all the while), and then, or whenever a shoot appears) pot up each individual plant and with luck it will grow a shoot the following spring and flowering should occur within five years.

    As tree peonies are commonly surrounded by seedlings this is not as difficult as it may sound. 

     

     Good luck

     

    Boggy

     

     

    Beware the bat-eared bogweevil
  • 17/06/2008 06:28 PM
    • debs1963
    • kent
    • 17 Jun 2008
    • 3
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    Thanks Boggy, much appreciated.  As I have 2 lots of pods from the blooms I may try both the 'clever' and 'normal' options and see which works best!

  • 17/06/2008 07:49 PM
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     I have not had much success with the 'clever' method (there is a conclusion to be drawn here perhaps) so I would be interested in how you get  on.

     

    Boggy

     

     

    Beware the bat-eared bogweevil