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"wild onions in my lawn- help"

Last post 15-04-2008 10:01 PM by Dai Dibber. 26 replies.

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  • 15/03/2008 07:27 PM
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    I have found that my lawn is now beginning to be infested with wild onions, seems much worse this years, does anyone have any suggestions on how to get rid of them, have tried digging out but u will always leave some bulbs behind. I am happy for any suggestions of selective weedkiller that will kill the blighters for good, when it comes to these weeds I am happy to be as un-green as necessary. Really dont want to dig whole lawn up, but happy to reseed selectively, thanks for any advice

  • 15/03/2008 08:18 PM
    • miranda
    • Oxfordshire
    • 17 Nov 2004
    • 4,155
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    Hello Peter, it sounds like wild garlic, or ramsons. It's really invasive and you see large areas of it growing in woodland. I wonder how it got into your garden? I don't know if one of those weed-and-feed type products would do it, might be worth a go. Other than that, you really might have to start a new lawn. Sorry not to be more positive, but I've seen it growing round here and it can cover a large area quite easily.

  • 15/03/2008 10:35 PM
    • Phot's-Moll
    • The sunny South coast.
    • 06 Jan 2007
    • 4,672
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    I think lawn weedkillers would kill them.

    http://patsysplot.blogspot.co.uk/
  • 16/03/2008 06:06 PM
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    Just for info, looking on u.s. websites they seem to have the same problem and find that lawn weed killers have no effect on these little blighters, they recommend a general weed killer, not available here which will kill them and not the grass

  • 18/03/2008 11:02 AM
    • Plantman
    • North Yorkshire
    • 30 Jan 2008
    • 276
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    Lawn weedkiller or 'selective herbicides', the same thing will not kill these plants. The way in which these weedkiller are selective is the shape of the leaves. Grass, and indeed the Onion family have the same shaped leaves (monocotyledons), and the weedkiller just runs straight off them. You will be wasting your money. You could try using a 'total' weedkiller, preferably a translocated / systemic one,that the plants will take in to their system. Thisis one that kills everything including your grass, then you can replace the lawn later. Only do this when the Onions are in active growth though, when the leaves are growing and can take in the weedkiller, or it wont kill them. Plantman.

  • 18/03/2008 06:35 PM
    • Bog Myrtle
    • Southern Turkey
    • 07 Feb 2007
    • 346
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    Now me, rather than go to all this effort and zapping, I would just keep the grass cut regularly. I suspect ramsons won't like being repeatedly cut and will disappear itself - and if it doesn't, well, it is green and pointy, not dissimilar to grass, and will it really be all that noticeable anyway if the lawn is cut ? But then I'm a fairly idle soul!

  • 19/03/2008 09:12 AM
    • David
    • 25 Mar 2005
    • 128
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    I think Bog Myrtle's advice is correct with regard to this difficult problem. A respected allium specialist told me recently that wild garlic only photosynthesizes between mid April to June so if the mower is used regularly during this period it should, in time, disappear. If you have the problem in your borders use the hoe regularly during the same period. David Member 29971 [Edited on 19/03/2008]

    David. Member 29971
  • 19/03/2008 03:44 PM
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    Thanks for all your replys, will a product such as Roundup do the trick, I know it will kill parts of my lawn, but will it kill yhe onions, Also interested in concept of mowing, as they are bulbous , how does mowing actuallty stop the bulbs multiplying

  • 19/03/2008 03:59 PM
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    Bulbs store goodness to flower in spring - cut off foliage and therefore no goodies for bulbs = catastrophe for bulbs. Theoretically vigourous use of your lawn mower will starve the bulbs. If you feed your lawn to boost grass growth so much the better and if you can spike, scarify and rake and generally get the lawn in good nick the allium bulbs will feel the squeeze in a very big way. Having said that wild alliums are robust blighters and you may have to be at 'em for several years. Roundup will kill them, but with difficulty becasue the glossy allium foliage is hard to wet and you want a good lethal dose of glyphosate to be taken down into the bulb to kill them, so again several years of blasting with weedkiller may be needed. On the other hand glyphosate will kill your lawn completely with one light application. I would preen your lawn and mow vigorously to suppress the alliums unless the lawn is shaded, when I would use glyphosate until all alliums are dead and then plant up with something more suited to shade or, if you really must, shade-tolerant turf. But don't blame me if it is never much of a lawn. Boggy

    Beware the bat-eared bogweevil
  • 19/03/2008 05:41 PM
    • Bog Myrtle
    • Southern Turkey
    • 07 Feb 2007
    • 346
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    To me, "Roundup" is a vicious nasty substance best left well alone. It may well (eventually) kill off your ramsons, but at what cost? Your lawn will also be a bomb site, and you will successfully have also zapped untold bees, butterflies and other helpful beasties. Not to mention, in all probability, yourself and any family you may have around the place. Roundup is a dubious product - you don't want to go believing all Messrs Monsanto will tell you about how safe it is; remember they only want to make money. A quick "google" of the name will bring you up site after site where roundup is being indicted or suspected of being the culprit in all sorts of eco-and-health disasters, from spontaneous abortions to disappearing bees. Just stick to the lawnmower - in the first place, it'll work as well as anything else, in the second place it costs you nothing, and in the third place it isn't likely to be implicated in the destruction of life as we know it!

  • 20/03/2008 11:07 AM
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    Glyphosate is fantastic stuff and despite decades of use there is no evidence that it causes harm that stands up to scientific scrutiny. All the same any rational person should use restraint in spreading biologically active chemicals in the environment and consider other alternatives first. However, when you have an intractable problem glyphosate is a safe, sensible alternatives and sensible people should not be put off by unsubstantiated anxiety. Boggy

    Beware the bat-eared bogweevil
  • 22/03/2008 01:44 AM
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    I found a lawn care and landscaping article website that may help you. [url=http://www.stwebsite.com]www.stwebsite.com[/url] GardenLover

  • 22/03/2008 02:02 PM
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    The website is North American and is not only factually incorrect but the materials suggested are unavailable in Britain. Boggy

    Beware the bat-eared bogweevil
  • 22/03/2008 11:05 PM
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    Many thanks for all your advice, have given my lawn a good mowing and will keep it up over the summer to try and eradicate the blighters, i like to be given technical advice as i am a scientist myself, I dont find find peoples hang-ups about products particarly helpful, most substances if used sensibly are perfectly safe, i found the comments about roundup that caused abortions , kills all wildlife, etc, particularly unhelpful and quite frankly not what i would have expected from a site such as this, to those who gave me some very interesting info on how these onions actually grow etc , many thanks

  • 23/03/2008 11:34 AM
    • miranda
    • Oxfordshire
    • 17 Nov 2004
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    Unlike yourself, Peter, most of us are not scientists and don't have the benefit of your scientific education, so it is probably quite normal that differing views wil be aired on a forum like this. We are all different, after all. Don't let it upset you; however right or wrong others may think them to be, gardeners have always had ideas they hold to. It is part of the tradition, is it not?