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Cutting back leylandii

Last post 16-05-2007 12:21 PM by Ian L. 14 replies.

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  • 26/11/2006 12:25 PM
    • pierre
    • 26 Nov 2006
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    Six months ago I moved to my current home which on one boundry has a leylandii hedge which I am told is approx. 20/25 years old and has been pruned over the years but still stands 30 / 40 feet high. I want to cut it back and the advice I am receiving from the guy who would carry out the job is that a third to perhaps a half is all that should taken off as anything more than that might seriously damage them. Any advice please.

  • 26/11/2006 12:52 PM
    • Digger
    • Northern UK
    • 18 Jul 2005
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    Pierre my friend, You have a serious problem with the damn things being so tall they do not re generate they will ruin your garden if you wish to grow anything worthwhile and can /do and will cause all manner of problems with the house structure , cut them down to the ground and grind the stumps and roots out, when i moved into my house we inherited a leylandii hedge all the way around the back garden it was evil dark satanic and everyone hated it so i got a company to come and eradicate them, all the neighbours were delighted and brought me cakes and beer and wine,it was good to see everyone hated leylandii, they are the most evil weed to infest the earth they are good for nothing and yours if left alone will grow to the size of a giant redwood they are a liability and any damage caused to neighbouring property will be your responsibility no wonder they sold the house do the planet a favour my friend and rid your garden of this pernicious weed before it ruin your life for ever, they cause all kinds of stuctural damage and if they are within 40 metres of your dwelling the insurance companies will not entertain any claims and you will be seriously out of pocket

    digger Devil Sage of the fells
  • 26/11/2006 02:56 PM
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    Or more briefly: Cut back by one third now. When the plants have recovered cut what remains back by half. Thus you might cut now to 20-33ft, then after a year or two end up with 12-16ft. If you hanker after less height, then you should probably whip the whole lot out and start again with beech or hornbeam.

    Beware the bat-eared bogweevil
  • 26/11/2006 04:11 PM
    • Digger
    • Northern UK
    • 18 Jul 2005
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    Oh Bogweevil, In your haste to cut straight to the chase and be brief you have ommitted to give the original questioner enough information to make a wise and informed decision

    digger Devil Sage of the fells
  • 27/11/2006 10:08 AM
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    Conifers and Leylandii do not regenerate if you cut into the "dead zone", ie, the branches with the brown leaves on in the centre of the plant! You will end up with a dead looking hedge if you cut too far in! so either make the decision to get rid (I wish you could talk to my neighbour about hers!!) or be careful how far in you prune!

  • 19/02/2007 09:57 AM
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    Hmm, in that case I guess that puts paid to me cutting one side off a 8ft leylandii hedge I have down one side of my garden - and hoping it grows back. I took about 4ft off the top last year and want to take out another 4ft from the top and make it a helluva lot narrower. As I see it the best answer is fence and/or beech - unless anyone has any better plans for the Leylandii? Thanks,

  • 19/02/2007 05:46 PM
    • Digger
    • Northern UK
    • 18 Jul 2005
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    Yes cut the leylandii down and put them through a shredder and compost the shreddings

    digger Devil Sage of the fells
  • 19/02/2007 09:33 PM
    • sue1002
    • Ipswich, Suffolk
    • 06 Sep 2005
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    I agree with digger.

    sue1002
  • 20/02/2007 08:02 PM
    • Bog Myrtle
    • Southern Turkey
    • 07 Feb 2007
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    Hedgetrimmer, bear in mind that fences are costly, need treated, painted, and maintained. Beech is nice, certainly, but it'll need a lot of work to dig out the leylandii, plant the beech, and look after them till established. I don't understand the outburst against leylandii really, unless maybe in a very tiny garden (do I detect a whole story of feuding neighbours here??) My mother had a lovely leylandii hedge round her garden (which was a big garden certainly), and it looked great, was easy to look after, kept nosey neighbours from peering into the house, had some gorgeous clematis and rambling roses clambering all through it, and best of all provided nesting and winter shelter for loads of birds. I wouldn't be too keen to rip it out, try pruning it a bit first and then think about it.

  • 20/02/2007 08:28 PM
    • sue1002
    • Ipswich, Suffolk
    • 06 Sep 2005
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    [b]Posted by:[/b] Bog Myrtle (do I detect a whole story of feuding neighbours here??)
    In my case it's the neighbours trees which they inherited and are currently about 12 foot high blocking the light from my garden and with the amount of moisture they absorb I am limited to what I can grow down that side of the garden. Hopefully this year they should be disappearing (we were told that last year too) and we have offered to help.

    sue1002
  • 02/04/2007 07:48 PM
    • sbunnie
    • 02 Apr 2007
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    We have inherited 8ft leylandii hedges on both sides of our 30ft patio garden - bit overwhelming to say the least! This may sound daft but instead of digging the things out has anyone heard of them being stripped back and used as 'living' fence posts????

  • 02/04/2007 09:51 PM
    • Digger
    • Northern UK
    • 18 Jul 2005
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    OOOH sbunnie, You have inherited one of the worst possible weeds in the world, if you decide to leave the leylandii in situ they will rob your soil of moisture and nutrients and your ground will be a barren wasteland, if you want to have some living fence posts they may do for a while but because they are shallow rooted the will not be firm for long if you cut off all the foliage theweed will die slowly and rot away which will be a weak fence and having the decaying remains of these weeds could invite honey fungus which you don't want at 8 feet tall your hedge could be in breach of the high hedges rule which is now part of the anti social behaviour bill and rightly so to grow these abominations near to anyones property is not very sociable in fact i would go so far to say they are bad for the environment and are anti social in every sense. cut them down my friend and let the lovely sunshine into your garden and relieve your soil of the immense burden that it is under the world will be a better place once you rid your life from these evil monstrosities.

    digger Devil Sage of the fells
  • 21/04/2007 07:08 PM
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    Oh yes. They must go. We had to get rid of 30 of them 9 years ago when we moved into our house, much to the delight of our next door neighbour, his insurers, his arboricultural engineer and the underpinners. Get my drift? A place for everything and everything in it's place. Leylandii is on a bonfire or in the middle of a desolate field.

  • 21/04/2007 11:47 PM
    • DunDiggin
    • Bracknell, Berkshire
    • 25 Feb 2007
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    Leylandii are not as much work to dig out as people would have you believe. I took out the 12 that formed the hedge in our garden a couple of years ago. A couple had only reached 4" thick but most were closer to 7" and formed a hedge about 7' high and 3' thick. They are actually quite shallow rooted, less that 2ft and typically have 4 or 5 main roots that hold the tree in place. If you try and dig close to the trunk you're asking for trouble. Start by digging a trench around the tree about 18" away from the trunk. Make sure you dig down about 15" using a sharp spade. This will reveal most of the supporting roots. Cut through these with a saw. now dig in toward the trunk keeping the trench reasonably clean. Once within 4" of the trunk you should be able to push the tree over - you did cut it off about 2ft off the ground didn't you. Cut any hidden supporting root - there is generally only one. and out comes the tree. If you've a line of them as in a hedge like mine, just start at one end and work your way along. I took mine out in about 12 hours. If you've access to mini-digger apply the same technique and it'll be able to pull them out quite easily.

    DunDiggin

    Blog: http://vortexs-veg-patch.blogspot.com
  • 16/05/2007 12:21 PM
    • Ian L
    • 16 May 2007
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    Hi Leylandii haters I moved into my house a few months ago. The previous owner had let the Leylandii hedge which runs down one side of my property (about 30 trees) grow up to around 15 meters in height and I have been hacking them down to 0 meters in height. Anyway I had (what I think) is a nice idea in that I would use the trunks to make raised planters. I was planning to strip off the bark, spray them with a wood preservative and then used either weed suppressing membrane or plastic to separate the slowly rotting trees from the soil which would hopefully prevent any fungus ect. Can anyone see any problems which could arise from this plan?