Skip navigation.

tomato blight

Last post 08-06-2006 11:15 PM by Mick, HOOE. 8 replies.

Page 1 of 1 (9 items)

  • 12/08/2005 10:11 AM
    • Digger
    • Northern UK
    • 18 Jul 2005
    • 5,233
    Top 10 Contributor
    Reply | Contact

    Fredjb have you considered using a sulphur candle?

    digger Devil Sage of the fells
  • 14/10/2005 08:02 AM
    • fredjb
    • 13 Oct 2005
    • 20
    Top 500 Contributor
    Reply | Contact

    I have a small (10 ft x 6 ft) polytunnel in which I grow tomatoes, climbing French beans, peppers, etc. The reason that I bought and erected the polytunnel (last year) is that I used to suffer with tomato blight when growing them outdoors. Unfortunately, the cover failed (perforated) this year which meant that it leaked and, although I received a replacement cover from the supplier, and installed it recently, my tomatoes have gone down with blight this week. I suspect that this is due to the leaking cover permitting the ingress of spores via wind and rain. I have removed/burned all the tomato plants and am removing the compost in the ring culture pots. The question then arises: what else do I need to do to ''decontaminate''/disinfect the structure and soil so that I can guarantee that I can grow tomatoes successfully next year? Is there a well-tried procedure to combat this problem? Any ideas would be much appreciated. Thanks fredjb

    fredjb
  • 30/11/2005 03:50 PM
    Top 25 Contributor
    Reply | Contact

    The risk of infection from old, infected plant debris is relatively minor compared to air-borne spores landing on wet leaves (hence tomatoes under cover are less prone to blight since their foliage should stay dry). Simply disposing of the blighted plants should be sufficient but if you want to be absolutely sure there is no harm in treating your pots and polytunnel structure with a solution of Jeyes Fluid or Armillatox (only approved for hard surfaces).

    Helen Bostock
  • 30/11/2005 09:00 PM
    • fredjb
    • 13 Oct 2005
    • 20
    Top 500 Contributor
    Reply | Contact

    Thank you very much, Helen. I shall attend to it in due course. Thanks again. Best Fred

    fredjb
  • 01/12/2005 10:55 AM
    • ndhort
    • 06 Aug 2004
    • 37
    Top 200 Contributor
    Reply | Contact

    I'd check with the manufacturer about spraying chemical on the cover sometimes certain chemicals can leave a permanent residue.Is your tunnel heated?

  • 01/12/2005 01:11 PM
    • fredjb
    • 13 Oct 2005
    • 20
    Top 500 Contributor
    Reply | Contact

    Thanks for the tip,ndhort. I'll certainly check that. Best fredjb

    fredjb
  • 08/12/2005 07:46 AM
    • fredjb
    • 13 Oct 2005
    • 20
    Top 500 Contributor
    Reply | Contact

    Helen and ndhort: Jeyes say: We wouldn't recommend the use of Jeyes Fluid as it attacks all forms of plastic. However the Greenhouse Cleaner should work and shouldn't react with the tunnel. The polytunnel supplier says: It [Jeyes Fluid] is completely safe and it will not damage your tunnel if you use diluted Jeyes Fluid inside the cover of your tunnel. Jeyes also say that their Greenhouse Cleaner is an effective bacteria killer but is not a fungicide. This is what I need - a fungicide. Can anyone recommend something suitable? Thanks fredjb

    fredjb
  • 08/12/2005 12:40 PM
    • fredjb
    • 13 Oct 2005
    • 20
    Top 500 Contributor
    Reply | Contact

    Thanks, digger. No, but now you mention it - and I've looked it up (!)- it's clearly the thing. I'll buy one next week. Thanks again. Best fredjb

    fredjb
  • 08/06/2006 11:15 PM
    Not Ranked
    Reply | Contact

    [b][i]Hi Helen, I have had tomato blight each year, and it seems to occur half way through 'picking season, rendering almost all of the outdoor plants and fruit useless. It also seems to effect around 5% to 10% of the plants in the greenhouse. I read your comments regarding safety precautions (Jayes Fluid/Armillatox) and wonder if you know of any other precautions one can take early in the season? Am I correct in believing that it is airborne spoores that transmit the problem? If so it's probably difficult to avoid. Do you know of any other websites that might offer advice in avoiding the problem of tomato blight? Thanks, Mick, HOOE. (East Sussex)[/i][/b]