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Goldcrest Cupressus conifers: will this plant (1 or more) fit in our size of ceramic planter?

Last post 04-06-2018 4:43 PM by Nigel. 9 replies.

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  • 18/05/2018 04:47 PM
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    We have a query re the planting out of Goldcrest Cupressus conifers in a specific size of ceramic planter.

    We have enough Goldcrest conifers to place 2 or 3 in each planter. (Dimensions of each – plant & planter – are cited below.)

    The question is: will the plant fit in a planter of the dimensions cited below, or will it be squashed in & so kill the roots?

    If it is OK to use this size of Goldcrest in the planter, then how many plants should we use in 1 planter? Will more than 1 fit in?

    And where should the plant be placed in the rectangular planter? e.g. if 2 are recommended for the space, then should 2 be placed equi-distant, or 1 at each end?

            DIMENSIONS OF Goldcrest conifer PLANT (plastic potted, as purchased at gardening centre):
            10cm (plastic pot, at base) (DIAM)
            13cm (plastic pot, at top) (DIAM)
            58cm of ENTIRE plant at current growth state [from base of plastic plant pot to top fern leaf i.e. incl. soil in plant pot itself]:
                  12cm of SOIL HEIGHT [from base of plastic plant pot to soil surface i.e. incl. soil in plant pot itself]
                  +
                  46cm of PLANT HEIGHT [from soil surface to top fern leaf i.e. excl. soil in plant pot itself]

            DIMENSIONS OF RECTANGULAR PLANTER – N.B. these are the dimensions of the INNER (plantable) area
            {but N.B. PLANTER INNER TAPERS SLIGHTLY TO BASE & ceramic surface of inner made from a mould etc. is NOT even & the planters are NOT identical to the exact cm}:
            47cm  (L)
            10cm (W)
            13.5cm (H)

    We bought the plants before we looked at the planter's dimensions – rookie mistake! ,-)

    I suppose it's a question of how much root spread we should expect.

    We don't really want to buy any more Goldcrests of a smaller size, but will if necessary. There's no point having 'throttled' plants struggling – yikes! ,-)

    Any ideas?

    :-) 

    ~ ASunnyAspect ~
  • 19/05/2018 05:15 PM
    • Nigel
    • Paignton
    • 27 May 2008
    • 440
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    To my mind the planter is too small forthe conifersyou have. As the base of the plant pot is as wide asyour planter and the soil depth of the pot is nearlythat of the planter.

    It is not a particularly large planter anyway; I would be inclined to use it for annuals and change seasonally and get larger planters for the conifers.

  • 21/05/2018 05:43 PM
    • Minnie77uk
    • Chesterfield
    • 18 May 2012
    • 295
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    If the Goldcrest conifer is similar to mine, in the outside earth, they have grown to about 8 feet although only about 2.5 feet wide. (Sorry, being old school / old I measure stuff mostly in feet and inches). I also have one that is in a container which is about 11 inches square at the top but tapers to about 6.5 inches at the base, although it is about 13 inches tall. My conifer has grown to only about 34 inches from soil to tip. Both were planted at the same time. I have lost one which turned brown slowly until I decided to give up on it. I agree with Nigel that your current planter is too small but it depends whether you want to use a planter to restrict growth. I doubt much will grow beneath it as the planter will gradually fill with roots and choke anything else in the pot. The RHS website https://www.rhs.org.uk/plants/details?plantid=602 suggests after 50 years it will be more than 12 metres tall and 4-8 metres wide in open ground. So not ideal in a planter of any kind unless you want root restriction to keep it small. I think you can buy dwarf conifers but this isn't one of them, I'm afraid.

  • 23/05/2018 12:51 PM
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    Thanks all

    Our intention is not to have tall conifers grow, as the size they currently are (approx. 46cm of PLANT HEIGHT + 12cm of SOIL HEIGHT = 58cm of ENTIRE plant at current growth state) is fine as it is. We just didn't want to 'throttle' them so they die once they are planted out.

    We were concerned that the root spread of a conifer of this size might be too great for the planter we have, & that 'throttling' might thus occur. So thanks for your helpful advice.

    Yes we thought the space might be too limiyted, as we compared the relative width & height of the soil versus the available space in the planter. I suppose in light of that comparison, at best 1 conifer could possibly be used per pot, but think your advice re getting a smaller conifer would be a far better idea.

    BTW, again, we presume it would be advisable to just use 1 conifer per pot?! ,-)

    Re "inclined to use it for annuals and change seasonally": thanks, but  sadly that won't work for our purpose, as the intention of these planters is to leave them in situ & just have an evergreen perennial in them (that can be watered whenever necessary but largely be left to its own devices). We also wanted a plant that will grow straight upwards, rather than more outwards like a hebe or a buxus. Hence the choice of conifers! :-)  Maybe there's an alternative plant to the conifer, that will offer the same kind of design options, that somebody can recommend?

    In the meantime we willl start looking for a smaller conifer. Or even search out the"dwarf" conifers that minnie77uk mentioned. Have never hear of these, so a bit of fun shopping is on the cards!

    ~ ASunnyAspect ~
  • 24/05/2018 07:12 AM
    • Nigel
    • Paignton
    • 27 May 2008
    • 440
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     Have a look at this website for ideas http://www.kenwithconifernursery.co.uk/ 

    This caught my eye Juniperus communis "Brynhyfryd Gold"

     

  • 24/05/2018 01:22 PM
    • Minnie77uk
    • Chesterfield
    • 18 May 2012
    • 295
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    I have seen the Goldcrest mini conifers in Sainsburys which are about a foot tall but no warning of their potential final size! We have an upright yew which is quite slow-growing. I don't know the variety but it has grown from only about 4 feet to about 8 feet in 20 years. Yews can also be pruned to shape & size. I think I once read it was an Irish yew, but not sure. Have you considered an Italian cypress which is very narrow but can grow quite tall? If roots are constricted, I think most plants will stay small. Good luck finding the right plant for your needs.

  • 31/05/2018 04:29 PM
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    Hi - thanks for the great advice Yes

    Re "Italian cypress" - thanks - have Web-searched for some photos - that looks a great plant, but we want small conifer plants for these planters, rather than majestic. Will save that lovely Italian cypress idea for another garden in the future!

    BTW, our own conifers were also supermarket-bought - Morrisons. Liike the Sainsburys version you mention, they were about a foot tall when bought. Fortunatelly the label has more info: a potential growth of 3metre height & 1metre spread, BUT of course that potential is all dependent on how much soil they are planted in etc., so info not as helpful as seems!

    Re "kenwithconifernursery" - thanks, Nigel. Have had a brief look at kenwithconifernursery website - so far have looked at 2 great webpages - re dwarf-conifers & dwarf-coniferssg (whatever "sg" is - LOL!).

    And thanks especially re the suggestion of: Juniperus communis "Brynhyfryd Gold". That looks to be a great plant! Perfect. Will look for a seller.

    As long as ithe leaves are soft like on the Goldcrest Cupressus, we are winning; we don't want something that looks prickly & rather like a micro Christmas tree! ,-)

    We also reckon it might be an idea to look these dwarf conifers up in the alpine section of one o our local garden centres. See what turns up there.Anything that grows locally there should grow in our soil too! (Same climate, & all that.)

    Something to add to the To Do list, this (hopefully sunny) weekend. :-)

    ~ ASunnyAspect ~
  • 01/06/2018 09:01 AM
    • Nigel
    • Paignton
    • 27 May 2008
    • 440
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     Morning

    sg = slow growing

    I would have a look for a specialist Alpine nursery rather than the local garden centre. Most garden centres buy their stock from large comercial growers and is growing in a medium not like your garden soil. A specialist nursery Alpine or otherwise is more likely to have propagated their own stock and know what conditions suit the plants.

    Nigel

  • 04/06/2018 01:04 PM
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    Nigel:
    sg = slow growing

    Thanks for that! Yes There's a lot of tech stuff to learn re gardening! Wilted Flower  ,-)

    P.S. re my mention of using local garden centres: what I meant by that was the independent & small local nurseries, the places where we already know they grown their own (not th shop-type garden centres) i.e. centres where they concentrate upon growing the plants, not on  the fancy labelling etc. ,-)

    Fortunately we have a few of these locally - like most places in the UK if venturing outside of towns & retail parks Whisper - where they sell a great range of plants, & at a far better price than the retail chains/more shop-centric garden centres.

    :-) 


    ~ ASunnyAspect ~
  • 04/06/2018 04:43 PM
    • Nigel
    • Paignton
    • 27 May 2008
    • 440
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     Sounds good, I hope you find what you want and it grows well for you.

    Nigel