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Last post 03-10-2013 7:13 AM by Nigel. 4 replies.

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  • 02/10/2013 09:22 AM
    • poppy1
    • france
    • 04 Sep 2013
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    Did you know that until henry the eigth came tobe that the uk didnt have any veg/herbs,

    it was during his time and the romans coming to the uk that the likes of cabbage lettuce etc became part of the uk's food chain,

    france and holland had veg but not the uk.Hmm

  • 02/10/2013 01:04 PM
    • Valerian
    • South Essex
    • 20 Jun 2010
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     What about turnips and manglewurzles. When did they arrive here?

  • 02/10/2013 07:27 PM
    • poppy1
    • france
    • 04 Sep 2013
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    Its said that in the 18 centry the turnip was used in the usa and europe, but the domestic turnip was recorded as far back as the 7 centry in india, so going by these dates i should imagen the 18 centry in the uk,

    but dont forget the raddish was also part of the turnip family. Known as the hot turnip.

  • 02/10/2013 07:58 PM
    • kaydee
    • Perthshire
    • 15 Feb 2009
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    I thought the ancient Celts & Druids did interesting things with native herbs.

  • 03/10/2013 07:13 AM
    • Nigel
    • Paignton
    • 27 May 2008
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     Morning

    Children were being told to eat their greens long before Henry VIII began chopping the heads off. his wives.

    The Celts used a number of plants as pot herbs including mallow, nettles, docks, plantains and the roots of wild carrot and parsnip. Also wild garlic, wild leek,ramsons, onion various legunes etc.

    The Romans introduced  cabbage, beet, lettuce, kale, garden carrots, parsnips, turnips  also vines, sweet cherries,various varieties of apple and pears.

    For more details see Food and Drink in Britain by C Anne Wilson probably out of print.

    Nigel