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Suggestions for vegetables & fruits for a small back yard?

Last post 21-02-2012 9:41 AM by Richard. 8 replies.

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  • 27/01/2012 01:41 PM
    • WilliamF
    • Yorkshire
    • 27 Jan 2012
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    Hi there, I'm a relative novice when it comes to gardening and so I'd really appreciate some advice on what vegetables, fruits etc would be suitable for growing in planters and pots so not to take up too much space. Any suggestions and innovative ideas are welcome!

  • 27/01/2012 01:53 PM
    • Susiq
    • Northumberland
    • 16 Feb 2008
    • 3,126
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    Hi WilliamF, welcome to the forum.

    There's tons of things that are suitable for container growing, potatoes, carrots, herbs, garlic, tomatoes, peppers, aubergines, figs, to list just a few! I'm sure others will be along with more suggestions. What kind of veggies are you interested in? Lots of seed catalogues are available now, Marshalls, DT Brown, Dobbies etc etc, why don't you send off for a few, I always think it helps to see the pictures to help decide what you want. Good luck with your plantingSmile

  • 27/01/2012 02:05 PM
    • WilliamF
    • Yorkshire
    • 27 Jan 2012
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    Thanks Susiq - I'm looking for things that will naturally replenish, if you know what I mean, or at least things I'll get a few pulls/crops from. Both out kids are quite good with their eating so they like all kinds of fruit & veg. The problem we have is space, so as much as the veg & fruit itself I'm also after innovative ideas on how to grow them.

  • 28/01/2012 06:08 AM
    • Julie
    • London
    • 28 Apr 2009
    • 481
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    I'd start with tomatoes and strawberries.

  • 29/01/2012 05:06 PM
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    If space is short, reach for the sky.

    Fill your freezer with a few pots of runner beans.

    Climbing French beans are good too, and you could grow some spinach, or pak choi, or lettuce prior to your beans.

    Spring onions are tasty and quick and easy to grow.

    Grow courgettes in pots, and you'll be overrun

  • 29/01/2012 06:13 PM
    • RogerB
    • Aylesbury, Buckinghamshire
    • 14 Jan 2009
    • 370
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    For fruit, if you have a sunny wall, or fence, you could grow an apple tree against it. You can now get trees with 2 or 3 different varieties on one root and that also applies to other fruit as well such as plums and pears. Because these tend to be on a 'dwarfing' rootstock you may be able to grow them in a large tub but the ground would always be the better option.

    Give it a go - it might just work!
  • 29/01/2012 10:55 PM
    • Scott
    • South Yorkshire
    • 20 Oct 2010
    • 138
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    Mr Fothergills do a range of seeds especially for growing in containers....

  • 04/02/2012 01:46 PM
    • helenscape
    • Thirsk, North Yorkshire, UK
    • 20 Jun 2009
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    Hi William, I have good success growing produce in pots and a few raised beds. The bigger the container the better. A raised bed made from tanalised timber at least 12 ins deep by 18 ins wide and as long as you like will grow much veg if sited against a sunny wall. You can even site the bed on concrete if you line the bottom with weed membrane and a couple of inches of stones or gravel before filling with compost. I have 2 this size that are each 8 ft long and although they only get full sun for half the day, I was able to grow climbing french and runner beans and climbing peas up canes, leeks, broad beans,lettuces and salad onions and then sprouting broccoli in winter. The main thing is water and a little feeding. I sometimes had to water twice a day in hot weather. I have grow blueberries, gooseberries and red currants inlarge pots and of course strawberries in fairly small pots. Again the answer is sum sun and feed but mostly water, keep well watered in hot or windy weather. Potatoes do well in bags, I use the strong ones sold by the supermarkets for about 40p, put some holes in for drainage, there as good as the specialist ones sold for £'s and the supermarket ones have built in handles. Lastly grow what you like to eat and have fun.

    Regards Helen.

  • 21/02/2012 09:41 AM
    • Richard
    • Whitley Bay
    • 21 Feb 2012
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    That seems like an excellent suggestion ("Potatoes do well in bags, I use the strong ones sold by the supermarkets for about 40p... ") so I might have to give that a try with any left over seed potatoes. How come I never think of things like that? :)

    Richard
    Small Plot, Big Ideas
    http://www.notionlogic.co.uk/blog/