Skip navigation.

Horse Manure

Last post 27-02-2011 4:14 PM by Digger. 12 replies.

Page 1 of 1 (13 items)

  • 03/02/2011 12:30 PM
    • Jim
    • Southwest Scotland
    • 23 Nov 2010
    • 5
    Not Ranked
    Reply | Contact

    Hi

    I have access to well rotted horse manure and wonder what plants/soil would benefit from it and where not to use it as I've heard it is rather strong compared to cow dung.

     

    Regards

     

    Jim

    Jim Brown
  • 03/02/2011 04:00 PM
    Top 25 Contributor
    Reply | Contact

     Hi Jim,

    I look forward to hearing what the bogweevil knows about this one!

    I heard that there are issues with horse manure that affect the veg gardener, both of which are solved by a thorough composting of the manure.

    These issues are bacterial diseases & undecomposed wood shavings that aren't good for short term soil fertility.

    I hope that helps!

    Ed

    www.ashridgetrees.co.uk
  • 03/02/2011 06:07 PM
    Top 10 Contributor
    Reply | Contact

    Dig in rotted manure at one or two bucketfuls per square metre or add as a mulch 5cm deep. Nutrient level is like all rotted manures very low so no worries. Boggy

    Beware the bat-eared bogweevil
  • 04/02/2011 10:33 PM
    • AlexS
    • Reading
    • 06 Sep 2009
    • 578
    Top 25 Contributor
    Reply | Contact

    I had a bag of 'composted stable manure' from a garden centre and, having nothing else available, used it to fill hanging baskets, planting bedding plants etc directly into it. I was worried about what would happen, but no problem. The plants grew well, flowered profusely, and water retention was good. The only difference between this stuff and a load of stable manure from a farmer is no weed seeds (probably), it's all evenly rotted, and it's about 50 times the price.

    Alex
  • 05/02/2011 08:36 AM
    • EvaInNL
    • Holland
    • 25 Sep 2009
    • 1,763
    Top 10 Contributor
    Reply | Contact

    @bogweevil - hello there! Question for you: I have access to quite a bit of manure as well (cow and horse). Not as nicely rotted down as Jim's though. Would it help the process if I spread it over my plot and then put a cover on it? Or would digging it in be better, with the growing season so close around the corner?

  • 05/02/2011 05:18 PM
    • Digger
    • Northern UK
    • 18 Jul 2005
    • 5,230
    Top 10 Contributor
    Reply | Contact

    Plie it up and let it rot Eva, then it'll be good stuff. Of course unrotted woodshavings in manure are only a problem if horse are bedded on manure some are bedded on straw and others on that easi bed stuff, straw takes a while to rot also, but adding nitrogen to the manure heap helps things along. I've never heard of anyone having problems with bacteria from manure though???

    digger Devil Sage of the fells
  • 08/02/2011 09:50 AM
    Top 25 Contributor
    Reply | Contact

    Digger, I didn't mean to be alarmist!

    I think someone would have to try pretty hard to get ill from manure, dedicatedly smacking themselves in the face with a fresh horse poopee pie every day.

    At any one time, a very small percentage of horses (and humans, for that matter!) is carrying a disease that could conceivably jump to a human, like  salmonella, e. coli or giardia.
    These things can spread in fresh dung and urine, but please refer to my earlier poopee pie hypothesis.

    Seeds of weeds that the horse ate are much more likely to be an issue in fresh manure.

    Anyway, I think we all agree: the way to treat manure is to let it wait and rot in a big pile for a good stretch, until it pretty much looks like really soft crumbly soil.

    Air is the key to composting manure quickly:

    The lazy-eco way is to bury pipes into your big pile. The pipes have holes (about 1cm in diameter)  drilled through them all the way down their length. This will improve ventilation in the middle, helping it rot & dispersing the odour.

    The get-fit-eco way is to reverse your pile now and then with a fork or spade, turning the outside of the old pile into the middle of the new pile.

    And the really fast way is to use a digger! Big Smile 


    www.ashridgetrees.co.uk
  • 08/02/2011 04:43 PM
    • Digger
    • Northern UK
    • 18 Jul 2005
    • 5,230
    Top 10 Contributor
    Reply | Contact

    Well as it happens we use a tractor with a front loader to shift our sh1t, at the moment we have about 7 tonnes at the stables so if anyone wants any muck free from weedkillers and weed seeds let me know!!

    digger Devil Sage of the fells
  • 09/02/2011 01:02 PM
    • Jim
    • Southwest Scotland
    • 23 Nov 2010
    • 5
    Not Ranked
    Reply | Contact

    Thank you all for your input. I'll have a go at digging some in.

    No point in having a horse and neighing yourself (sorry)

     

    Jim

    Jim Brown
  • 26/02/2011 01:00 PM
    • chriss
    • iwuk
    • 06 May 2009
    • 134
    Top 100 Contributor
    Reply | Contact

     Be careful with horse manure that has residue of horse wormer in it. A friend of mine had a pile of manure in her garden, from her own horse, ready to be dug into the veggie plot. Her chickens were scratching about in it and must have ingested some of the pellets. her chickens died as a result.

    Well rotted stuff certainly makes the veggies grow though.

  • 26/02/2011 10:50 PM
    • Digger
    • Northern UK
    • 18 Jul 2005
    • 5,230
    Top 10 Contributor
    Reply | Contact

    Horse wormer doesn't come in pellets? and if it did it certainly be in pellet form once it has passed through the horses gut. Maybe something else was in the manure. It is a common requirement of many equine establishments that horses are regularily wormed and vaccinated even on private stables most responsible owners will worm and vaccinate the horses frequently, I've never heard of manure from a recently wormed horse being kept seperate from the main middin? and so the muck is put on the same heap, I would guess that 99% of all horse manure available to horticultural users will come from horses that are regularily wormed and vaccinated.

    digger Devil Sage of the fells
  • 27/02/2011 02:59 PM
    • chriss
    • iwuk
    • 06 May 2009
    • 134
    Top 100 Contributor
    Reply | Contact

    Hi Digger. It was about 30 years ago. I seem to remember the pellets were blue, a bit like slug pellets to look at.

  • 27/02/2011 04:14 PM
    • Digger
    • Northern UK
    • 18 Jul 2005
    • 5,230
    Top 10 Contributor
    Reply | Contact

    Well there's nothing like that used now, I've never heard of such a tale most horses are wormed and so most of the available manure has used wormer within it, and therefore as there has been no "wormer" problems that I've heard of  in the last 30 years I think gardeners can rest assured that they no longer need to beware of using manure from horses that are well cared for.

    digger Devil Sage of the fells