Skip navigation.

Ribes Sanguineum - Propagation?

Last post 12-04-2005 8:52 AM by Obelix. 10 replies.

Page 1 of 1 (11 items)

  • 08/04/2005 01:19 PM
    Top 150 Contributor
    Reply | Contact

    Really easy, but you have to wait till autumn for this method. Cut back quite hard after flowering so you get nice long new shoots. In autumn take 10" long cuttings, and dip in hormone rooting powder. Find a spare bit of cultivated ground for a nursery bed, stick a spade down and rock it back and forward to mae a V wedge about 9 - 10" deep. Put some sharp sand in the bottom. Sit the cuttings in the little trench so only about 2" is above ground, about 6" apart. Heel in and just forget about them. By the next autumn most if not all will be ready to plant out to final positions.

    Goldilocks
  • 08/04/2005 03:42 PM
    Top 500 Contributor
    Reply | Contact

    Ribes sanguineum is an easily rooting shrub. I remember that we picked bouquets of it in spring and that the stems produced roots when in water for only a few days. Cuttings taken in late autumn to earliest spring will root fast, either in water or in wet soil or sand.

    Have a nice day!
    Susanne
  • 09/04/2005 02:49 PM
    • William
    • 24 Nov 2004
    • 210
    Top 75 Contributor
    Reply | Contact

    I suppose that it is the red currant you're referring to. The easiest way is to take winter cuttings 20-30 cm long pencil thick and just stick them in the ground leaving some 10 cm above the soil. Quite easy

    Happy Gardening, William
    (Netherlands)
  • 10/04/2005 10:51 AM
    Top 500 Contributor
    Reply | Contact

    Ribes sanguineum, the flowering currant, is a decorative shrub with pale pink to almost red flowers. The red currant is Ribes rubrum.

    Have a nice day!
    Susanne
  • 10/04/2005 11:00 AM
    • William
    • 24 Nov 2004
    • 210
    Top 75 Contributor
    Reply | Contact

    Yes you're right. Thanks for putting me straight on that one... Rubrum .... Sanguineum all red.... ;-)

    Happy Gardening, William
    (Netherlands)
  • 10/04/2005 11:21 AM
    Top 500 Contributor
    Reply | Contact

    No problem William... ; ) Just one thing... Ribes rubrum includes the white fruiting varieties ...sorry.

    Have a nice day!
    Susanne
  • 10/04/2005 11:26 AM
    • William
    • 24 Nov 2004
    • 210
    Top 75 Contributor
    Reply | Contact

    I know, It's a bit like Wisteria which is called "Blue Rain" over here.... the one we've bought however produces white flowers.... ;-)

    Happy Gardening, William
    (Netherlands)
  • 11/04/2005 08:58 AM
    • Obelix
    • Belgium
    • 24 Nov 2004
    • 442
    Top 50 Contributor
    Reply | Contact

    Hi William. I have a white wisteria just called alba which has yet to produce flowers but, after reading some of your earlier posts on the subject, it seems I have woefully neglected appropriate pruning. I also hae a blue and white one which flowered while it was still in a pot but did nothing last year after I planted it out on its own new trellis. I'm hoping for better things this year.

    Obelix - Belgium
  • 11/04/2005 09:09 AM
    • William
    • 24 Nov 2004
    • 210
    Top 75 Contributor
    Reply | Contact

    Hi Obelixx My wisteria goes bij the beautifull name "Wisteria floribunda longissima alba". This far my pruning efforts over the last two winters have finally resulted in producing ONE big fat bud..... so it is fingers crossed for the magnificent display we were promissed on the label..... Wisteria should do well without any pruning too, but these will grow very big and will take longer to flower I suppose. Our's has limited space and has to be teased a bit to produce a dense pack of flowers. At least that's the idea I've not been able to turn into practice yet.....

    Happy Gardening, William
    (Netherlands)
  • 12/04/2005 08:52 AM
    • Obelix
    • Belgium
    • 24 Nov 2004
    • 442
    Top 50 Contributor
    Reply | Contact

    Mine's the same one then. I bought it to cover our front wall which a previous farmer owner has had faced with bricks of the wrong colour and size for the region. The plan is to hide it under a mass of rosa Kiftsgate and the wisteria and any clematis that feels like following their lead. After years of searching, I've finaly found the vine eyes I need to xxxxx into the wall to string wires for them all to cling to. So far everything has to be regularly hacked back to trellis height. This year they can run wild and free and next year they can flower their socks off - I hope.

    Obelix - Belgium
  • 04/06/2005 09:46 PM
    Not Ranked
    Reply | Contact

    Hi - this is my first post here, and I'm hoping for some advice. I've recently moved house and in my garden there is a beautiful ribes. Think it is sanguineum, and it has lovely pale pink flowers at the moment. Any advice, please, on the best way to propagate this pretty shrub? And what is the best time to do so please. Many thanks.