Skip navigation.

Cardboard loo roll plant pots work for me. Would wartime zoo keeper gardeners approve?

Last post 01-03-2012 4:12 PM by Richard. 9 replies.

Page 1 of 1 (10 items)

  • 25/08/2009 04:53 PM
    Not Ranked
    Reply | Contact

    Planting out seedlings in our recreated wartime zoo keeper's Dig For Victory garden, I've found cardboard loo or kitchen roll plant pots have worked well, degrade well into the soil as does the kitchen roll or toilet paper plug at the base (To stop soil falling out),  Would wartime zoo keeper gardeners approve?

    It saves us from using peat pots.

    ‘‘Our Wartime Garden project reflects the Dig for Victory gardens that sprang up in unlikely places all over the country, including zoos. It will also act as a living memorial to the bravery of many ordinary men, women and children. Newquay Zoo already recycles, composts and think about food miles when sourcing food for the café, and now the Victory Garden will demonstrate how keepers would grow food for the animals. Staff at the zoo are hoping for a good crop of vegetables before the weather turns!   You can keep up to date with developments on blog at http://worldwarzoogardener1939.wordpress.com/ To bring the period alive for families and schools visiting the zoo, staff members have been collecting wartime memorabilia and evocative items from everyday life of keepers, families, evacuated children and zoo visitors. It is hoped that visitors will contribute their stories and experiences for the archive as they visit the zoo. Our launch weekend for this garden project is this weekend 30th and 31st August 2009 www.newquayzoo.org.uk  World War Zoo

    World War Zoo is about looking back and looking forward, learning from the past to prepare for our future. The project developed from a chance discovery that zoos were closed in the early weeks of World War Two, and even though they were re-opened and supported as a way to boost moral, they struggled throughout. This was a time when food was short, and animals didn’t get ration books. Staffing was low with keepers being called up to fight, and repairs were difficult. www.newquayzoo.org.uk

     

  • 28/08/2009 10:30 AM
    • miranda
    • Oxfordshire
    • 17 Nov 2004
    • 4,160
    Top 10 Contributor
    Reply | Contact

    Looks interesting, I'd like to see the display. For sure, the loo roll inners would have been approved of but I reckon the newspaper would have been torn up for use in the toilet. Have you found any soil block makers amongst your artifacts?

  • 11/09/2009 10:31 PM
    • thelma
    • York
    • 11 Sep 2009
    • 1
    Not Ranked
    Reply | Contact

    I use cardboard loo rolls for Sweet peas, and also for Runner beans, and plant the lot.  But I don't believe they were invented in wartimes!

    I Use yogurt pots as small plant pots. I make a hole in the bottom with a corkscrew, or if I have a lot, I put them inside each other and my husband goes through the lot with a drill.

    For many years, I've used supermarket bags as bin liners in my pedal bin.  Now they are getting smaller to put us off reusing them.  Looks like I'll have to start buying pedal bin liners, so much for recycling. I also use them instead of pots, for temporary storage, when lifting and moving large plants.

    Thelma

     

  • 31/12/2009 03:29 PM
    • terraGirl
    • The Norfolk Broads
    • 28 Dec 2008
    • 20
    Top 500 Contributor
    Reply | Contact

    I've used loo rolls for raising plants from seed, but the rolls got mouldy and affected the plants. The problem seems to have been the glue used in the rolls which turned white, mouldy and soggy. 

    Tins seem to work well for me, as do yogurt pots. 

     Edith 

  • 01/01/2010 11:31 AM
    Not Ranked
    Reply | Contact

    Thanks for your interest. I've not found these planters as 1940s artefacts but will probably use at events the modern wooden 'plant pots from newspaper' ones still made. Being a modern recreation of a dig for victory wartime garden for the future  we can freely use the modern available versions.

    We've kept people posted on our work so far on our blog http://worldwarzoogardener1939.wordpress.com  

  • 01/01/2010 11:35 AM
    Not Ranked
    Reply | Contact

    Thanks for your tips - very useful to pass on at world war zoo gardens events (we've another one in May 2010) - the recycling and sustainability side of gardens like these generate much 'go home and try it' interest, especailly if you're on a budget!

    We're keeping people posted on the garden progress (planning next year's crops now) on http://worldwarzoogardener1939.wordpress.com and our facebook page for the garden.

  • 01/01/2010 11:41 AM
    Not Ranked
    Reply | Contact

    Thanks for your reply. We've experienced the soggy white cardboard problem, yet some seedling survive this. I'll try out yoghurt pots and tins as an alternative, as well as the newsapaper planters some people kindly suggested. .

    You can keep up to date with developments on blog at http://worldwarzoogardener1939.wordpress.com/ and facebook profile for the garden. even lettuces and cabbsge need facebook friends

  • 22/02/2012 09:45 AM
    • Richard
    • Whitley Bay
    • 21 Feb 2012
    • 8
    Not Ranked
    Reply | Contact

    I may be late to this thread but it's nice to find that I'm not alone in collecting toilet roll tubes over the last few months in preparation for sowing seeds this spring. I've never tried this before and the information provided here is very reassuring...

    Richard
    Small Plot, Big Ideas
    http://www.notionlogic.co.uk/blog/
  • 22/02/2012 08:12 PM
    • Snark
    • Suffolk
    • 12 Jan 2011
    • 380
    Top 50 Contributor
    Reply | Contact

    I use them for broad beans but in our dry neck of the woods you have to be careful to keep them damp.plant them soggy and keep watering otherwise they just dry out and the roots fail to penetrate - but if you keep them too damp they go mouldy which isnt great for the young plants either.I suspect that they work better if you get more than 12 " of rain a year.

    For the Snark was a boojum you see
  • 01/03/2012 04:12 PM
    • Richard
    • Whitley Bay
    • 21 Feb 2012
    • 8
    Not Ranked
    Reply | Contact

    That's a good point that I hadn't considered and as I've been away on business most of the week I'm going to worry about them until I get home tomorrow. I'll have to get 'er indoors to give them a watering tonight I think... :) Pictures can be found on my blog

    Richard
    Small Plot, Big Ideas
    http://www.notionlogic.co.uk/blog/