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Tulips

Last post 15-06-2009 7:03 AM by Foxnfirefly. 35 replies.

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  • 06/04/2009 06:41 AM
    • JamesEB
    • 06 Apr 2009
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    I have grown some tulips in 12 large clay pots.

    I would very much like some advice on what to do with the tulips after they have finished flowering?

    JamesEB

  • 06/04/2009 09:02 AM
    • sue1002
    • Ipswich, Suffolk
    • 06 Sep 2005
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     Deadhead them once the flowers have faded and leave the leaves on until they die back (usually about 6 weeks), and plant some summer bedding in the same pot.  The bulbs can be left in place and will flower again for you next year.

    sue1002
  • 06/04/2009 10:25 AM
    • JamesEB
    • 06 Apr 2009
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    Thanks for your reply.

     

    I asked because I have had conflicting advice between lifting them and keeping them dry over winter and then replanting them or lifting them and straightaway planting them in the garden.

     

    It’s a very good idea to plant summer bedding over them in the pots but won’t the tulips get damp in the pots and rot and/or be damaged by frost and snow?

     

    JamesEB

     

  • 06/04/2009 02:19 PM
    • Phot's-Moll
    • The sunny South coast.
    • 06 Jan 2007
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     You can lift the bulbs, but I think you'll get better results with Sue'smethod - especially if you feed them well. The bulbs won't be bothered by cold, but would rot if left standing in water so make sure any water can drain out over winter.

    http://patsysplot.blogspot.co.uk/
  • 06/04/2009 03:29 PM
    • sue1002
    • Ipswich, Suffolk
    • 06 Sep 2005
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    A lot of people do lift their tulips each year after flowering.  I live in one of the warmer places in the UK and can get away without the need for lifting anything.

    I've had some tulips in plastic pots which also house small shrubs for the last 8 years or so and they come back every year, they don't appear to be affected by frost or snow (when we get any snow that is, which isn't very often)

    sue1002
  • 06/04/2009 03:36 PM
    • poppikin
    • Glorious Surrey
    • 06 Apr 2009
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    Thanks Phot's-Moll for interesting info.

    If leaving them in pots when would you feed them as you suggest?

    What bedding plants would Sue and you grow in there?

    Poppikin

  • 06/04/2009 07:03 PM
    • sue1002
    • Ipswich, Suffolk
    • 06 Sep 2005
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    Any bedding plants can be planted with them Poppikin for a continuous summer display.  For my pots I use begonias, marigolds, petunias, trailing lobelia, busy lizzies.  Once the summer display is over, you could plant pansies and primulas which will give some colour and flowers for winter.

    sue1002
  • 07/04/2009 02:10 AM
    • JamesEB
    • 06 Apr 2009
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    Thanks

    With regard to Phot's-Moll's advice that they would do well especially if you feed them well, if leaving them in pots when would you feed them and with what please?

    James EB

  • 07/04/2009 05:31 AM
    • Foxnfirefly
    • Virginia,USA
    • 01 Jul 2008
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    Best time to feed tulips is when they begin to emerge in the Spring.  They do best with dry bulb food, which consists of bone and blood meal.  Tulips fare better in shaded areas in summer that have good drainage.  Clay pots tend to dry out quickly in summer,so watering will need to be monitored--too much will saturate and too little can dry them up. 

  • 07/04/2009 06:08 AM
    • JamesEB
    • 06 Apr 2009
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    Thanks Foxnfirefly

    Sorry, I was asking about when to feed them while using Sue's method to keep them in the pots over winter and Phot's Moll's advice that would give good results "especially if you fed them well".

     JamesEB

  • 07/04/2009 09:21 AM
    • Phot's-Moll
    • The sunny South coast.
    • 06 Jan 2007
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    Ordinary liquid or soluble plant food such as you'd use on the bedding plants will be fine or you could use tomato fertiliser. You can start feeding now at the manufacturers suggested strength.The best bedding plants to use are the ones you like best! If you're just planting one or two pots it might be worth buying a 'hanging garden collection' or tray of bedding from a garden centre, but there's still time to raise your own from seed. 

    http://patsysplot.blogspot.co.uk/
  • 07/04/2009 10:59 AM
    • poppikin
    • Glorious Surrey
    • 06 Apr 2009
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    I think JamesEB was asking about you saying that you would feed them well in the winter while in pots to get good results.

    That is interesting as you wouldn't normally feed them in the winter when they are not growing?

    poppikin

  • 07/04/2009 01:09 PM
    • sue1002
    • Ipswich, Suffolk
    • 06 Sep 2005
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    My tulips come back each year and they've never ever been fed - I change the top couple of inches of compost every couple of years and that's it, they only get watered when the pots need it.

    sue1002
  • 07/04/2009 01:38 PM
    • Phot's-Moll
    • The sunny South coast.
    • 06 Jan 2007
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     I wouldn't feed them in winter when they're not actively growing.

    http://patsysplot.blogspot.co.uk/
  • 07/04/2009 02:02 PM
    • JamesEB
    • 06 Apr 2009
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    Thanks Phot's-Moll That seemed to be what you were saying in the first of your posts but that's fine.

    I have another problem in that there are gaps in all of the pots where some tulips did not come up (any ideas why that was?)

    When I thought I'd have to lift them it was easy to put them all back in place but how do I fill the holes if I leave them in over winter?

    Thanks also Sue1002

    JamesEB