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Algae etc on my patio driving me nutty

Last post 31-08-2011 4:31 AM by Gertroid. 16 replies.

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  • 03/11/2008 03:20 PM
    • helojed
    • Suffolk
    • 03 Nov 2008
    • 23
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    Almost all of my garden is plants with hard mulch, however the patio (of old slightly uneven bricks) to get it to it is constantly green with algae, and therefore slippy. Have done the old wire brush, washing up liquid and pressure washer - whcih is fine for a couple of weeks, but wondered if anyone had any tips to slowing the process. I've gone down the route of expensive pati cleaners, but to my mind, I think it was just thick bleach andd did a much worse job than elbow grease and Fairy. Jeyes? Obvisouly don't want to use anything to hurty my plants nearby

  • 03/11/2008 04:16 PM
    • Digger
    • Northern UK
    • 18 Jul 2005
    • 5,230
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    Hello my friend you can use jeyes fluid and the new formula has a much nicer fragrance, also armillatox is excellent as it will kill any fungal spores etc.. non of these products will do harm to your plants and they will kill all kinds of nasties in the soil, although new legislation means that jeyes is no longer recommended for use as soil sterilant,but it's okay for the patio

    digger Devil Sage of the fells
  • 03/11/2008 08:19 PM
    • Phot's-Moll
    • The sunny South coast.
    • 06 Jan 2007
    • 4,668
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     If it's green and slippy just a few weeks after cleaning it, them I'm guessing that it's in the shade and almost constantly damp? Can you do anything to change the conditions? Pruning overhanging trees, or fixing a leak for example? 


    http://patsysplot.blogspot.co.uk/
  • 03/11/2008 09:08 PM
    • sue1002
    • Ipswich, Suffolk
    • 06 Sep 2005
    • 9,675
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     If the bricks for the patio are uneven, is it possible to take them up and lay a new patio with a slight slope on it so the water will drain off? 

    sue1002
  • 04/11/2008 09:36 AM
    • helojed
    • Suffolk
    • 03 Nov 2008
    • 23
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    Thanks for that - am going to give it a go!

  • 04/11/2008 09:37 AM
    • helojed
    • Suffolk
    • 03 Nov 2008
    • 23
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    LOL - if I weren't so cack handed yes! I think I will fill in some of the gaps int he mortar though as Im sure they are habouring nasties too and a tiny bit of standing water

  • 21/11/2008 12:11 PM
    • James1664
    • UK
    • 28 Aug 2008
    • 82
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     There was a post on here a while ago regarding the use of a product found in garden centres - but the person who suggested it was ostracised by other members here and the post was removed.  Luckily, I managed to read the post, went out and bought some and found it to be brilliant on driveways, car parks and block paving.

    Roll on the weekend!
  • 21/11/2008 05:56 PM
    • Sue
    • Loughton, Essex
    • 20 Nov 2008
    • 9
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    I use washing soda for everything, from cleaning my shower, to washing my plastic garden furniture, my replacement windows and my patio, which was a lovely shade of green when we we moved to this house. Put a couple of handfuls in a bucket of hot water, mix it round and scrub the patio with a stiff brush. No idea how it works, but I can honestly say it does. I've a shady patio at the end of the garden near our pond, which would be covered in algea if I didn't occasionally attack it with soda.

     Just in case you are not familiar with the product, my grandmother used it in her washing as it softens the water. She often poured it down her drains to dispel the grease. It is only about 50p from Tescos or Sainsbury's. I suppose you could put it in a pressure washer - I've never tried using it that way. 

  • 23/11/2008 08:42 AM
    • peony1gardens
    • Walton on Thames Surrey
    • 23 Nov 2008
    • 1
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    • Can you let me know what this product is that you bought in a garden centre? We have a path at the front of the house which is constantly covered in green algae despite pressure washing it. Many thanks.

  • 24/11/2008 10:17 AM
    • helojed
    • Suffolk
    • 03 Nov 2008
    • 23
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    Oddly not - it's the clearest part of the garden - I think the worst prob is that the water doesn't run off enough

  • 24/11/2008 10:18 AM
    • helojed
    • Suffolk
    • 03 Nov 2008
    • 23
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    Your right - I saw the same one -  but sometimes we do need to name names as it were! Thanks for the feedback

  • 24/11/2008 10:20 AM
    • helojed
    • Suffolk
    • 03 Nov 2008
    • 23
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    brilliant - I agree using 'old fashioned' products can be best. As of today I have a big thing of Jeyes I am going to give a go - couldn't find the other one unless online. Whenever I go to my local garden centre - they have everything except the one thing I need!! LOL. Will revert back here to report on the green creep! Will probably find your washing soda works best in the end....

  • 24/11/2008 10:21 AM
    • helojed
    • Suffolk
    • 03 Nov 2008
    • 23
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    it was armillatox - but why not try the washing soda first - it sounds like the sensible option and a darned sight cheaper. I will report back on the success of the Jeyes....

  • 07/01/2009 11:23 AM
    • helojed
    • Suffolk
    • 03 Nov 2008
    • 23
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    Over a month on and the algae is not making an appearance, so happy so far with Jeyes solution. COuld be it is down to it having been quite dry, but fingers crossed. Many thanks for all everyone's help

  • 24/02/2009 10:52 AM
    • Geoff Wood
    • Stockport
    • 24 Feb 2009
    • 1
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    Never use a pressure washer or an ordinary hose gun. It will simply spread the algae on to adjacent surfaces so it makes the problem worse. Always kill the algae first. Algae and moss grow more readily if the patio does not get much sun. They will also grow on a north-facing roof, especially if the slope is shallow. For many years I have used Domestos or cheaper versions of thick bleach. I put a litre of bleach in a 2 gallon watering can, top it up with water (out of my water butt) give it a stir, then sprinkle it on the patio. Cheap thin bleach is less effective. Thick bleach contains a lot of salt which perhaps help to kill the algae. The same treatment works on brick walls. Don't let too much bleach run on to the lawn or garden beds or into a pond but a small amount will not matter. For a small area, you can use Flash Bleach spray or your supermarket's own version. Just spray it on and leave it to dry. Don't use the spray on a windy day and take care not to breath in the vapour. Flash Bleach spray also works on our wooden gates. After a few days the algae turns from green to brown. It will eventually disappear but if you want to clean it off, use a scraper or a brush or pressure hose. Our back lawn has a garden path formed from small patio slabs at least 70 years old. The original colours vary - red, green, yellow, brown but after three or four years they all look black. We lift alternate slabs a few at a time and put them in a plastic tray filled with diluted bleach. After a few days, the original colour comes back. You can't do this if the slabs are cemented down but a stone path can be laid on flagging sand without using cement. It is then easier to raise the level of the path when the lawn surface has risen slightly after a few years. We use the soaking treatment for loose cement bricks. They come up like new. I tried Jeyes fluid many years ago but thick bleach is much cheaper and the smell disappears sooner.