Skip navigation.

Seaweed makes plants healthier.

Last post 19-04-2008 11:23 PM by Ariadne. 53 replies.

Page 1 of 4 (54 items) 1 2 3 4 Next >

  • 02/04/2008 09:43 PM
    • Phot's-Moll
    • The sunny South coast.
    • 06 Jan 2007
    • 4,672
    Top 10 Contributor
    Reply | Contact

    I've read claims that feeding plants with seaweed extract can help them cope better against pests and disease. I know it contains some nutrients and these would help any plant deficient in them, but is there more to it than that? 

     

    http://patsysplot.blogspot.co.uk/
  • 02/04/2008 10:58 PM
    Top 10 Contributor
    Reply | Contact

    Some manufacturers claim that their seaweed preparations contain cytokinins, a kind of plant hormone that suppresses senescence and boosts growth.  I have not seen this proven independently so have to remain rather sceptical.

    It is certain that seaweed contains some nutrients but as the manufacturers often omit an analysis one has to suspect that there is not very much and that there are cheaper ways and more effective ways of feeding your plants.

    However, seaweed has one major advantage  - it is not a byproduct of animal husbandry or the slaughterhouse or a chemical factory and is therefore ideal for vegetarian organic gardeners who are unable to make sufficient compost. 

    Boggy

     

     

     

     

    Beware the bat-eared bogweevil
  • 02/04/2008 10:59 PM
    • Anemone
    • County Down, Northern Ireland
    • 08 Feb 2008
    • 575
    Top 50 Contributor
    Reply | Contact

    Is seaweed good for adding to a compost heap?  I'm near the coast and would gather some if it would be good.

    Anemone
  • 02/04/2008 11:26 PM
    Top 10 Contributor
    Reply | Contact

    It most certainly is and no need to worry about the salt apparently - we thrashed this one thoroughly a while back: http://mygarden.rhs.org.uk/forums/p/15065/15065.aspx#15065 

     Boggy

     

     

    Beware the bat-eared bogweevil
  • 03/04/2008 12:06 AM
    • Digger
    • Northern UK
    • 18 Jul 2005
    • 5,234
    Top 10 Contributor
    Reply | Contact

    maxi crop is a liquid seaweed that is diluted and watered onto crops ,but it really humdings badly,Anemone how will you cart the seaweed from the beach? do you have a pony and trap or a horse? or does your neighbour have a horse or pony for you to borrow? or will you have to carry it all yourself?

    It will probably humding for ages maybe you will have to trench it into the ground? one of the well known gardens in Cornwall uses seaweed straight from the beech but I don't use it, if you are near the coast you should be able to grow good beetroot they like salt,and if the sea weed is salty the slugs won't like it

    digger Devil Sage of the fells
  • 03/04/2008 07:38 AM
    • Anemone
    • County Down, Northern Ireland
    • 08 Feb 2008
    • 575
    Top 50 Contributor
    Reply | Contact

    Thanks or the link Bogweevil.

    digger, I'll have to do it the environmently unfriendly way of driving there, loading up a few old compost sacks, slinging them in the boot and driving home.  I don't have any access to live horsepower unfortunately.  I will try composting some but also the idea of spreading it onto the beds as a mulch in Autumn to rot down over winter.  It would keep the weeds down if nothing else.

    Anemone

    Anemone
  • 03/04/2008 05:18 PM
    • Phot's-Moll
    • The sunny South coast.
    • 06 Jan 2007
    • 4,672
    Top 10 Contributor
    Reply | Contact

    I collect mine on my pushbike - so that's a million points to me!!!

    I put it on the compost heap. I like to think it helps it rot down more quickly, but as I only bother collecting it in the summer, the warm weather is probably what makes the most difference. I haven't noticed any bad smell, but I only get a small amount at a time and mix it in with other things.

    I've heard that it can be used 'fresh' and that unlike other things it doesn't impoverish the soil while it rots down. 

    http://patsysplot.blogspot.co.uk/
  • 03/04/2008 06:24 PM
    • Susiq
    • Northumberland
    • 16 Feb 2008
    • 3,126
    Top 10 Contributor
    Reply | Contact

    Can it be ANY type of seaweed? I'm on the beach most days, and am now keen to explore using this 'free' added ingredient for the compost heap, plus I've noted Diggers point about the beetroot - only planted the seeds yesterday so would like to give it a go!

  • 03/04/2008 06:32 PM
    • Digger
    • Northern UK
    • 18 Jul 2005
    • 5,234
    Top 10 Contributor
    Reply | Contact

    Hi susiq lucky you being near the beach, i'll bet you find loads of interesting stuff on there. I suppose any seaweed will do, apparently beetroot love the salt, but if you want them for the showbench don't let them get any bigger than a tennis ball. Have you ever found anything interesting or valuable? I found a piece of rope once at St. Annes

    digger Devil Sage of the fells
  • 03/04/2008 07:06 PM
    • Susiq
    • Northumberland
    • 16 Feb 2008
    • 3,126
    Top 10 Contributor
    Reply | Contact

    yeah - I've found a few rocks!!! Not the sort I'd wear tho'.........

  • 05/04/2008 11:53 AM
    • Phot's-Moll
    • The sunny South coast.
    • 06 Jan 2007
    • 4,672
    Top 10 Contributor
    Reply | Contact

    I've read a few references to seaweed - none of them mentioned a particular type, so I suppose they're all good.

    I hadn't thought about slugs not liking the salt. That alone is a good reasone to get some. I'm off to the beach ... 

     

    http://patsysplot.blogspot.co.uk/
  • 07/04/2008 08:40 PM
    Top 10 Contributor
    Reply | Contact

    Here is the analysis from oneof the few seaweed fertiliser manufacturers to publish this data - as you can see it contains very little nutrient value.  You can understand the reticence of most suppliers to publish:

     

    Nitrogen

    0.05%

    Phosphate (P2O5)

    0.08%

    Potash (K2O)

    0.20%

    Aqua regia calcium

    0.56%

    Aqua regia magnesium

    1.04%

    Aqua regia sodium

    7.45%

    Aqua regia zinc

    142 mg/kgDM

    Aqua regia copper

    9.38 mg/kgDM

    Aqua regia iron

    476 mg/kgDM

    Aqua regia manganese

    42.13 mg/kgDM

    Aqua regia sulphur

    21900 mg/kgDM

    Boron

    363 mg/kgDM

    Boggy

     

     

     

     

    Beware the bat-eared bogweevil
  • 07/04/2008 08:57 PM
    • Phot's-Moll
    • The sunny South coast.
    • 06 Jan 2007
    • 4,672
    Top 10 Contributor
    Reply | Contact

    Hmmm, see what you mean. Compared with growmore or tomato feed, it doesn't look very impressive. D'you know how Aqua regia calcium etc differs from ordinary calcium? Maybe that's what gives it it's special seaweedy goodness?

    http://patsysplot.blogspot.co.uk/
  • 07/04/2008 09:42 PM
    Top 10 Contributor
    Reply | Contact

    Aqua Regia is a mixture of Nitric and Sulphuric Acid  - you can tell what my favourite subject was at school - and I believe this refers to the way calcium is extracted from the seaweed sample analysed.  With luck an analytic chemist will read this and give a better answer.

     Boggy

     

    .

    Beware the bat-eared bogweevil
  • 07/04/2008 09:47 PM
    • Digger
    • Northern UK
    • 18 Jul 2005
    • 5,234
    Top 10 Contributor
    Reply | Contact

    So what is the difference between seaweed "meal" and "calcified" seaweed,other than one is calcified, which has more nutrients?

    digger Devil Sage of the fells