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Stewed Garlic as an anti-fungal treatment for Plants (Guest post from Chris Beardshaw)

Last post 07-06-2006 3:40 PM by VickyB. 11 replies.

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  • 16/12/2004 12:21 PM
    • admin
    • 20 Nov 2003
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    "My top science tip for successful gardening is to stew garlic (Allium sativum), or wild garlic (Allium ursinum), in water and mist the liquid onto your plants to keep fungal complaints like mildew and black-spot at bay. This process is successful as Allium species are naturally high in sulphur; an element that is known to combat fungi." [i] Posted on Behalf of Chris Beardshaw.[/i]

  • 18/12/2004 01:32 PM
    • ken69
    • Norfolk UK
    • 23 Nov 2004
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    Brilliant..Aint nature wunnerful.I regularly use rhubarb mixture as insecticide too, and washing up liquid diluted for aphids.Glad the EU banned so much toxic stuff.

  • 18/12/2004 04:01 PM
    • P Stick
    • North Wales
    • 24 Nov 2004
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    Surely the smell is a bit offputting to be used seriously; roses amelling of garlic? Chris is having a larf..........

    P Stick
  • 20/12/2004 01:59 PM
    • Jak
    • East Sussex Coast
    • 23 Nov 2004
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    Companion planting Alliums, such as Chives amongst Roses is supposed to help prevent Black Spot. Jak

  • 20/12/2004 05:27 PM
    • P Stick
    • North Wales
    • 24 Nov 2004
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    Hi Jak - I think you have said it when you use the word prevent as I have found that it is as much as you can hope for. The CB method would not improve the scent in MHO, much as I like garlic which is why I believe it is a bit of a leg pull by CB. You'd be better off coating the roses in soot if you want 'free' sulphur.

    P Stick
  • 20/12/2004 05:28 PM
    • P Stick
    • North Wales
    • 24 Nov 2004
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    Furrther to above - I meant to say 'supposed to prevent'.

    P Stick
  • 21/12/2004 09:09 AM
    • Jak
    • East Sussex Coast
    • 23 Nov 2004
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    Hi P Stick. I used 'supposed to' deliberately as chives haven't stopped my 'Koreesia' rose succumbing to Black Spot and I'm told that it is a resistant variety of rose! Jak

  • 21/12/2004 12:18 PM
    • P Stick
    • North Wales
    • 24 Nov 2004
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    Hi Jak - I think we are on the same wavelength here - why don't we invent a few to test CB?...........Like burying a piece of pork under a cooking apple tree so the fruit make good apple sauce.........;-)

    P Stick
  • 21/12/2004 03:09 PM
    • Jak
    • East Sussex Coast
    • 23 Nov 2004
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    .... heard the one where you plant mint in a container lined with sheeps' wool? LoL! Jak (o:

  • 21/12/2004 05:02 PM
    • P Stick
    • North Wales
    • 24 Nov 2004
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    .............and water horseradish with cow's milk once a week........;-)

    P Stick
  • 22/12/2004 08:43 AM
    • Jak
    • East Sussex Coast
    • 23 Nov 2004
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    ....it must be full-cream of course - none of this skimmed rubbish! LoL Jak (o:

  • 07/06/2006 03:40 PM
    • VickyB
    • Portugal
    • 07 Jun 2006
    • 46
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    I have tried stewed garlic and got nothing but smelly leaves on the roses. I also planted garlic under the roses and got nothing but garlic ... still had the black spot, but the vampires have all gone away! My latest is the washing up liquid in water in a spray bottle with a half teaspoon of bicarbonate of soda added : the washing up liquid for the aphids and the bicarb for the black spot ... so far so good with this concoction! VickyB