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David Bellamy on butterflies and bees

Posted by Jean Vernon on 22 May 2009 at 06:14 PM

The RHS Chelsea Flower Show is the launch pad for many things over the week. This year one major lawnmower company and exhibitor (Countax) invited environmentalist David Bellamy to the show to publicise their sponsorship of a new Butterfly conservation project; Butterfly World.

 

 "We've been working on this for a very long time and very soon we are opening the biggest butterfly display in the world in St Albans, it's been a lot of hard work and then in two years time we'll have an enormous great dome there with 10 000 butterflies from the Tropics, all bred specially, not taken from the wild, there to show people."

"It's not rocket science, you can get butterflies back in your back garden."

Dressed in a bee T-Shirt his passion and enthusiasm for butterflies, bees and biodiversity was apparent. "When I was a kid in London, in the war, I could go out and pick a bunch of wildflowers for my mum. And those wildflowers had scents; they had nectar and where have all those flowers gone? Well we've changed things, Chelsea has been here year after year, after year, showing people how to do everything, and all of a sudden the green renaissance or a multicoloured renaissance is here and we are seeing those flowers with scent coming back in. If we took all of our bees away, one third of all our crops just wouldn't get pollinated, they are important, and yet people scream ‘ooowww I've been stung by a bee', in those days, we had a blue bag you used and you just dabbed it on it."

"The real thing is that we've crunched the biodiversity of the world; because we've gone round using pesticides and using all these other things and we've lost the things that make the world go round.  By the time I get recycled I hope that every kid in London can actually walk out and pick a bunch of wild flowers for their mum."

  Let's hope it's a very long time before this enigmatic character gets recycled.

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