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Graham Rice's New Plants Blog

Graham Rice Garden writer and plantsman Northamptonshire and Pennsylvania

Editor-in-Chief of the RHS Encyclopedia of Perennials; writer for a wide range of newspapers and magazines including The Garden and The Plantsman; member of the RHS Herbaceous Plant Committee and Floral Trials Committee; author of many books on plants and gardens.

  • Date Joined: 18 Oct 2006

Sweet Pea 'Sir Henry Cecil': New from Mr Fothergill's Seeds

Posted by Graham Rice on 09 Sep 2013 at 04:52 PM

Sweet Pea 'Sir Henry Cecil': new from Mr Fothergill's Seeds. Image ©Mr Fothergill's seeds
This new sweet pea is raised by the world’s most innovative sweet pea breeder, Dr Keith Hammett, and named to commemorate Newmarket’s great racehorse trainer Sir Henry Cecil.

Formerly known as ‘Chocolate Flake’, this sweetly scented variety features white flowers streaked on both sides of the petals in shades from bright red through to milk chocolate. This type of sweet pea is inherently a little variable and the colour can also be affected by weather conditions, but the range of shades makes a very harmonies bouquet. It is now available from Mr Fothergill’s Seeds.

"We knew Sir Henry loved his flower garden as a form of relaxation from the pressure of training racehorses, and so we were honoured when Lady Cecil agreed to our request to name the new variety in his memory", said the company's joint managing director John Fothergill.
 
Sweet Pea ‘Sir Henry Cecil’ was developed in New Zealand by RHS Cory Cup winner Dr Keith Hammett. Such is his reputation that Mr Fothergill’s now puts a special flash on the packets of all its sweet pea varieties bred by Dr Hammett to highlight their origin.
 
In a training career based at Newmarket, close to Mr Fothergill’s offices and trial ground, Sir Henry Cecil won 3431 races worldwide including twenty five British Classic races.

Sweet Pea ‘Sir Henry Cecil’ is available only from Mr Fothergill’s Seeds.

For more on Keith Hammett, take a look at this profile in the RHS magazine The Plantsman.

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