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New Year's resolutions, Pete Beale and chickens

Posted by Dawn Isaac on 16 Jan 2011 at 02:11 PM

New Year’s resolution number 1 - Blog at least once a week

So, OK, this isn’t going well, but in fairness no-one really lives up to their  resolutions.  All I’ve really done is get my failure in nice and early which basically puts me ahead of the game.

Still, I have decided to use this blog to list a few other gardening-based resolutions. I’m hoping that by declaring them in public, I might feel a certain added pressure to achieve at last some of them.  So here we go.

Resolution 2 - Erect our donated greenhouse

This is actually going quite well in that I have invited my father to come and stay for a weekend. This may seem a fairly odd way to construct a garden building until I point out that my father is a little like Tommy Walsh on speed and, on previous ‘weekend stays’ has built me a fitted wardrobe, laid a patio, put up countless shelves and taken down at least 30 trees.

So I’m already confident that the greenhouse will go up – even if my sole contribution is doling out some hospitality

3 Make a market stall

My idea, which may sound a little demented, is to have a barrow-style mini market stall from which the kids can sell garden produce in the village (think Pete Beale – the Eastenders character rather than the rose grower.)

My main stumbling block for this is finding old pram wheels as my father has said he’ll build me one if I can locate them (I fear there is a pattern emerging here and it’s doing nothing to enhance my ‘hands on’ reputation).

4 Help out at the school gardening club

I’m now into my third year running the pre-school club, but I would like to help out at my older children’s school as well.  This is partly because I’ve never done anything for the school and partly because I’m excited to work with kids when my main concern is not whether they’ve stuck seeds up their noses.

My only fear is that my tendency to try and ‘take over’ could see my out on my ear within the term after an unsuccessful left-wing coup attempt.

5 Keep chickens

This may prove tricky. The one spot I had in mind for a chicken coop has now been assigned the greenhouse. Plus, my husband hates chickens (“vicious little b******s” is one of his milder descriptions). In fact, I’m not entirely sure I’m a huge fan, but I remember collecting fresh eggs as a child which is something I’d love the children to experience (I also remember my older brothers lassoing the poor unsuspecting birds and dangling them from their legs, which I’m less keen to echo).

So there are five resolutions - one I’ve already failed on, one I’m not sure I want to achieve and two of which I’ve already assigned to my Dad. Hmmm. 60% is still an acceptable pass rate right?

Comments

Eva said:

Good for you Dawn and good luck with your resolutions, especially the one to keep chickens.  My plan, when I retire, is to hopefully have enough space to keep a few chickens, so if you do achieve this, let us know how you're getting on!

on 21 Jan 2011 at 02:05 PM

Dawn Isaac said:

Eva - I shall keep you updated. I have since discovered our local garden centre even has a poultry section so my resolution appears in danger of being kept.

on 24 Jan 2011 at 02:59 PM

Snark said:

I also suspected that chickens were a bit beady eyed and aggressive but mine are delightful,friendly,productive etc. There are a couple of snags. They are very destructive. A typical small commercial coop turns into a pigsty in no time but if you free range them they trash the garden. They get eaten by foxes which is upsetting. They get less productive with age and you feel tempted to get some more but are not heartless enough to cull the originals! However mine give me a lot of pleasure and lots of eggs. They live behind an electric fence to keep the foxes off and I move them round to save damage.Snark (Smallholder from Suffolk)

on 26 Jan 2011 at 07:23 PM

Snark said:

I also suspected that chickens were a bit beady eyed and aggressive but mine are delightful,friendly,productive etc. There are a couple of snags. They are very destructive. A typical small commercial coop turns into a pigsty in no time but if you free range them they trash the garden. They get eaten by foxes which is upsetting. They get less productive with age and you feel tempted to get some more but are not heartless enough to cull the originals! However mine give me a lot of pleasure and lots of eggs. They live behind an electric fence to keep the foxes off and I move them round to save damage.Snark (Smallholder from Suffolk)

on 26 Jan 2011 at 07:23 PM

Dawn Isaac said:

Snark - thanks for the info and yes, I am worried about the pigsty effect.  I have a spot I think might work, but the idea of them trashing the garden gives me a nervous tic! We're in the middle of a village so I'm hoping the foxes may be less tempted because I doubt I can stomach a massacre.

on 02 Feb 2011 at 09:51 PM